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December 2019 Newsletter

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Volume 49, December 2019  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein, ghavenst [AT] ncsu [DOT] edu 

 

2020 wpc  

World's Poultry Congres 2020

16-20 August, Paris, France

Scholarship Awards

During the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France in 2020 Scholarship Awards for respectively the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award and the WPSA Education Award are going to be presented.
Information about the awards and the nominations, which should be received at least six months before the Congress can be found here.
The deadline for receipt of submissions will be 1st March 2020.
Nominations must be send by e-mail to wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl. One hard copy of the complete nomination should be send to Dr R.W.A.W. (Roel) Mulder, Secretary WPSA, PO Box 31, 7360 AA Beekbergen, The Netherlands.
In case you want to send the nominations by Courier Service, please e-mail wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl for the address (courier services cannot deliver to a PO Box).
To show how awards are utilized, those nominated must, if successful, undertake to present a report of their work at the next World’s Poultry Congress following the one at which the award was made.

International Poultry Hall of Fame

The next presentation of members for the International Poultry Hall of Fame (IPHF) will take place at the next World’s Poultry Science Congress in Paris, France in 2020.
To have enough time to prepare the election for the International Poultry Hall of Fame the nominations of individuals should start as soon as possible.
You can find the guidelines for the nomination and election procedure and the instruction sheet for the 2020 Hall of Fame selection here.
Branches with less than 100 members have the right to nominate 1 candidate. Branches with more than 100 members have the right to nominate 2 candidates for the International Poultry Hall of Fame.
If your Branch intends to nominate a candidate or candidates for the IPHF you should pay attention to the deadline for the nomination: December 31st, 2019.

Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay Competition

At the latest Board meeting, held during the Poultry Science Association (PSA) meeting in Montréal, Canada, it was decided to start the Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay competition.
Five travel awards ($2000 each) will be made available on a competitive basis to full time graduate students for attendance at the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France, 16-20 August 2020. The original essay of up to 2000 words should address the topic ‘The possible role of the World’s Poultry Science Association in education’. The 5 winners should come from different continents, they have to be a member in 2019 and must be between the ages of 18-30.
The details for the Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay competition are published on the website and you can download the guidelines. Deadline is 1st February 2020.

Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC)

Preparations are underway for the formation of a Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC), which committee is in charge of seeking candidates for the WPSA Board 2020-2024. The NAC will be chaired by Dr Mamduh Sifri. Branches and members can propose candidates for the offices of President, five Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer.
Further information can be found in the WPSA Constitution and By-laws (Constitution article IV-5 and By-Laws article II-8 through 11).

World's Poultry Congress 2024

The Board of the World’s Poultry Science Association (WPSA) has received three bids to organise the World’s Poultry Congress 2024. The bidding Branches are Argentina (Buenos Aires), Canada/Mexico/USA (Toronto) and South Africa (Cape Town).
In the Constitution it is stated that if there are more than two bids, an electronic vote of the Council will be conducted to pre-select two finalists (WPSA By-Laws, Article III-4).
The winner of the bid will be selected by the Council by secret ballot during the Council meeting, which will be held at WPC2020 in Paris.

59 Branches were eligible for the pre-selection, 33 branches took the opportunity to send their votes.
After receiving the ballot forms the following result was obtained:
Argentina        Buenos Aires 113 votes
Canada           Toronto           120 votes
South Africa    Cape Town     143 votes

The Canada/Mexico/USA bid and the South Africa bid therefore are selected to the final ballot during the Council meeting, 18 August 2020, Paris, France.

Updates on the above mentioned topics will be publsihed on the WPSA website under the heading !! WPC2020 !!.

   

Abstract Submission and Registration for WPC2020

Abstract submission and registration for WPC2020 are open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

World’s Poultry Congress 2020 Paris, France
Preparations are underway for the Council meeting during the next WPC. One of the main points on the agenda of the Council meeting will be the election of the city and country for the next World’s Poultry Congress in 2024. There have been 3 bids to hold the WPC 2024. According to our Constitution and By-Laws, branches are voting which two candidates cities will be forwarded to official vote during the Council meeting. The candidate cities are: Cape Town proposed by the South Africa branch and Toronto proposed by the Canada/USA/Mexica branches.

Branches have also been informed on nomination procedures for the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award; the WPSA Education Award; Inductees into The International Poultry Hall of Fame; and, for the Nominating Advisory Committee (i.e., the committee in charge of seeking candidates to serve on WPSA’s board for the years 2020-2024). For the NAC, Branches and members can propose candidate names to be considered by the NAC for service on the board. Further information and all guidelines for each of these committees are available on www.wpsa.com under WPC2020.

WPSA presence at exhibitions and conferences
In 2020, WPSA will be present during many events. Examples are the exhibitions IPPE, Atlanta, USA, VIV MEA, Abu Dhabi, UAE and Victam Asia and Animal Health and Nutrition, Bangkok, Thailand and the scientific meetings, the Mediterranean Poultry Summit, 25-27 March 2020, Cordoba, Spain and the 1st Poultry Nutrition symposium 25-26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand. Information on the programmes can be found on www.mpn-wpsa.org/spain2020 and the WPSA Calendar.

Promotional materials of WPSA, the World’s Poultry Science Journal, WPC 2020 in Paris, France, symposia and conferences will be on display. We expect to meet with many members during these events. Members and all interested persons are invited to attend the events and to meet many other WPSA members and representatives.

WPSA World’s Poultry Science Journal
Starting 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be hosted and produced by Taylor and Francis Publishers.

WPSA programmes
WPSA has several programmes to support members and branches. Details on the Travel Grant programmes, the Speakers’ Bureau programme and proposals for Branch Development can be found on the WPSA website under Support. Criteria for eligibility are published together with the (different) deadlines for the individual programmes. Please follow the instructions as inaccurate, incomplete and late applications have to be rejected.

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH)
The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization organizes training courses on poultry (for 3 à 4 weeks) in several countries. More details are on www.wvepah.org. All activities will also be announced on our website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

This quarter has been an active one, with much activity in Latin and South America. In October, I was pleased to attend Ovum 2019 in Lima, Peru. Prior to my arrival the Peruvians, after some years of inactivity, had reorganized their Branch. Of great assistance to me, both before and during the meeting, were Branch members Dr Eliana Icochea and Dr Alfredo Condemarin (new Branch President). With their local assistance, I was able to put together a WPSA Student Breakfast Meeting, the day before the start of Ovum 2019. 

Students from different parts of the country made their way to Lima for the event. I gave the first talk on students using WPSA for their professional development. I spoke in English, but all my slides had been translated into Spanish by Benjamin Ruiz (Watt Publishing). I also gave the history of WPSA and my personal history of working with poultry and the poultry industry. Dr Icochea spoke next, followed by Dr Condemarin, and then Dr Cobian (Pres of AMEVEA, Peru). The former President of the Mexico Branch, Dr Carlos Lopez Coello, gave an emotional short address to the students about seizing opportunities and making a lifelong career in poultry.

A nice brunch was served to the students and they ate heartily. Some of them had arisen at 2:30 AM and taken a 3 hour bus ride to be present. Even after the Programme ended and all the food was gone, the students lingered and visited with the adult poultry scientists. Those of us in the latter group, all left with full hearts.

We now have our nucleus of student members in the Peru Branch. Two have already contacted me about applying for Travel Grants. I see much promise in the revitalized Branch.

Past President Edir da Silva joined me to staff a WPSA booth at Ovum 2019. Dr Icochea secured a table for WPSA in the booth of the Scientific University of the South. The booth actually backed up to the booth of Gonzaga University in Chincha. All of their students, who had travelled to Lima, attended the WPSA Student Breakfast. So we had guardian angels in those students and their professor.

During the course of the event, I was able to meet with representatives of several Branches and collect their dues. We also met with a contingent from Cuba, who want to reactivate their Branch. In addition to members from South America, I had interactions with the Mexico Branch officers and met the new President of ANECA.

I have been contacted by many student members interested in using WPSA Travel Grants in 2020. Of course, interest in attending WPC - Paris is very high. I am delighted to be working with many of those students and their major professors.

My warmest wishes to you and your families as you celebrate your end of the year holidays.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer


World's Poultry Congress 2020, Paris, France

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It is with great pleasure that the French branch of WPSA invites you to attend the 26th World Poultry Congress in Paris, from 16th to 20th August 2020. Our ambition is to prepare an attractive congress for the benefit of a large number of participants from all over the world. We will be giving special consideration to the Mediterranean and African Poultry Networks, by offering them the possibility of holding specific satellite symposia, and we are also planning to organise a symposium with FAO. As usual for a WPC, the programme will include an exhibition for companies within the Congress Centre, and we will offer a Youth programme as well as a Young Scientist programme. We plan to make the scientific programme highly interactive and interdisciplinary.

Registration: In order to insure your participation to this prestigious event, you can now register and benefit from the Early bird registration fees until December 31st, 2019. Please join us in Paris at the Palais des Congress (Porte Maillot) on August 16-20, and meet more than 3000 delegates from over 100 countries.

Submission: The WPC programme will feature object-oriented sessions integrating various approaches to address a complex challenge, and specialized sessions corresponding with the scope of our WPSA working groups. In addition, 11 plenary talks will address major issues for the poultry sector as a whole and will take place all day on Monday August 17 and on the morning of Thursday August 20. You have until December 31st 2019 as the very last day to submit your work for an oral or e-poster presentation. Please consider this as a strong deadline as there will be no date extension.

Renowned speakers from all continents of the world will be involved with WPC2020 and will speak on the following topics:

• Nutrition
• Breeding and Genetics
• Egg Quality
• Poultry Meat Quality
• Reproduction
• Hygiene and Pathology
• Waterfowl
• Poultry Welfare and Management
• Turkeys
• Education and Information
• Physiology

http://www.wpcparis2020.com/ 


Newly Compiled List of Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl


European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022. A full report for EPC2018 was published in the December 2018 issue of the WPSJ.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2021. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espnThe Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from September 20-23, 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the symposium website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQThe next ‘XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat’ will be conjointly held with the ‘XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products’ from June 21 to 23, 2021 in Kraków, Poland. Please visit http://www.eggmeat2021.com/ to keep yourself updated. Special reduced registration fees will be available for WPSA members and students. We will look forward to seeing all of you there. Prominent invited speakers from American and European Institutions will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production. A new website will be developed and registration information will be provided in the near future.


Asia Pacific Federation

The host for the upcoming 12th APPC was named during the General Meeting, and the China Branch will host that event.

2020 apf poultry nutrition symposiumThe Asia Pacific Federation is organising a Poultry Nutrition Symposium on 25 & 26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand. The programme is available on the WPSA website.
For more information please contact Dr Nasir Mukhtar, nmukhtar [AT] uaar [DOT] edu [DOT] pk

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

There will be Ratite Research Sessions during the upcoming World Poultry Congress in Paris, France from 16-20 August 2020. Please send any suggestions for contributions and topics to anele [AT] elsenburg [DOT] com.

Researchers involved in research on any Ratites (ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaries or kiwis) are asked to contact the Ratite Group. Please send an email to: anele [AT] elsenburg [DOT] com.


Anel Engelbrecht, Chair


7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

The Mediterranean Poultry Network has planning underway for the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit that will be held at the University of Cordoba in Cordoba, Spain during Mach 25-27 2020. The website is: www.mpn-wpsa.org. Following are several tentative dates for you to plan for this conference.

Important Dates:

Conference Dates    March 25-27, 2020
Preliminary Notification of Abstract Acceptance   December 1, 2019
Early Bird Registration   December 21, 2019
Final Notification of Abstract Acceptance   December 21, 2019
Full Paper Submission Deadline   December 31, 2019
Registration Deadline   March 25, 2020

Carlos Garcés Narro <cgarces [AT] uchceu [DOT] es>


World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you will receive an email from Taylor & Francis before the end of the year with instructions on how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact support [AT] tandfonline [DOT] com”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • E.A. Awad - Prebiotics supplementation: An effective approach to mitigate the detrimental effects of heat stress in broiler chickens
  • T.R. Kannaki - Marek's disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian poultry
  • J.-J. Chen - Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat strss in chickens in the humid tropics
  • A. Salamon - The double-yolked egg: from the 'miracle of packaging' to nature's 'mistake'
  • O. Olgun - Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry
  • M. Tixier-Boichard - From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?

Summaries

Prebiotics supplementation: An effective approach to mitigate the detrimental effects of heat stress in broiler chickens

E.A. AWAD, I. ZULKIFLI, S. RAMIAH, E.S. KHALIL and M.E. ABDALLH

As a consequence of global warming and food security issues, heat stress has become an emerging problem. Heat stress causes huge economic losses in the broiler industry that negatively affects the production performance of chickens. Therefore, a variety of strategies have been examined for mitigating the heat stress problem. Among these strategies, the use of prebiotics has received increasing interest due to the beneficial effects of prebiotics on the health and production of heat-stressed broilers. The evidence from existing studies suggests that prebiotics can mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on broiler chickens by benefiting the intestinal microbiota, gut morphology, oxidative status, physiological stress response and subsequently growth performance of broiler chickens. For instance, prebiotics given to heat-stressed broilers at a dose as low as 0.025% have been shown to improve the feed intake, body weight gain and feed efficiency by 7.5, 9.9 and 2.3%, respectively. This review summarises the recent findings on prebiotics as an effective approach to improve the well-being, health and growth performance of broilers under heat stress conditions.

Marek’s disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian Poultry

T.R. KANNAKI and V. GOWTHAMAN

Marek’s disease (MD) is one of the re-emerging diseases in Indian poultry. MD outbreaks are reported from different parts of the country in spite of vaccination, causing major economic losses. Flock mortality of 10-40% was observed in vaccinated flocks during outbreaks, although MD is well controlled with vaccination. Almost 100% of the commercial poultry flocks are vaccinated at hatchery level. Bivalent (HVT+SB1 or HVT+301B/1) or monovalent (HVT) vaccines are used in India. In spite of the intensive vaccination practice, outbreaks are being reported from different parts of the world including India. MD virus (MDV) Indian field isolates from different outbreaks during last decade are categorised into virulent (vMDV) and very virulent (vvMDV) pathotypes based on different serotype 1 specific gene sequencing and in vivo pathotyping. The emergence of virulence in MDV is attributed to compromised bio-security, concurrent immunosuppressive diseases and vaccination failure. MD outbreaks in vaccinated flocks of Indian poultry flocks cause annual loss of approximately 4 crore Indian rupees. Country-wide surveillance and reporting of MD outbreaks and further characterization of the Indian field isolate should be taken as a priority. Reviewing the current vaccination strategy, and examining the need for the introduction of more effective vaccines that give better protection against the more virulent strains should be considered with equal importance along with improved bio-security measures, management practices and more effective control of immunosuppressive diseases.

Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat stress in chickens in the humid tropics

K.A. LARTEY, D.-J. KANG, Q.-H. ZHANG, C.-Q. SHI, F. YANG, H.-Y. LIN, R. GOONERATNE and J.-J. CHEN

Chromolaena odorata contains polyphenols and antioxidant enzymes that activate biology defence mechanisms and stress-sensing transcription factors to prevent oxidative damage and heat stress in chicken. Dietary inclusions of C. odorata leaf meal at 12%, and C. odorata crude flavonoids at 400 mg/kg/d exerted competitive exclusion to enhance gut eubiosis, humoral immunity, hypoglycaemia and metabolic functions, necessary to attenuate oxidative stress in chickens. Ethanol extract of the herbal plant at 25 – 400 µg/mL showed a strong antioxidant capacity in vitro, similar to 10- 80 µg/mL standard ascorbic acid. Chromomoric acid C- 1 from C. odorata methanol extract, at 10 µg also demonstrated anti-inflammatory potential by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NF-κB in a luciferase reporter assay at inhibition capacity (IC50) of 6.9 µM. These biological defence properties of the obnoxious weed have potential to maintain gut microbial homeostasis and gut integrity, enhance antioxidative physiologies for cellular oxidative balance, and mitigate oxidative damage required to alleviate heat stress. The invading nature of the plant in the humid tropics makes it a readily available and cheap bioresource. Hepatotoxic, mutagenic and cytotoxic evaluations suggest the aerial parts of the herbal plant is a safe bioresource for animal nutrition and sub-therapeutical uses.

The double-yolked egg: from the ‘miracle of packaging’ to nature’s ‘mistake’

A. SALAMON and J.P. KENT

Double-yolked (DY) eggs were mostly described in domestic precocial species, and are rarely found in nature. It is estimated that 1-3% of domestic hen and duck eggs are DY.

DY eggs occur when two yolks are encapsulated in a single shell and therefore differ from SY eggs in their external and internal characteristics. In previous decades DY eggs were distinguished from SY eggs only by their external characteristics, and this proved to be wrong, as over 40% of DY eggs have similar external characteristics in terms of size and shape to SY eggs. The internal characteristics of DY eggs constrain their fertility. Yolks in DY eggs tend to be smaller, probably ovulated early and are thus immature, having a significant negative impact on their reproductive potential with lower fertility levels. Further, the presence of a second yolk facilitates additional albumen secretion with the size of each yolk determining the additional amount secreted. This creates a primacy effect, i.e. the first yolk in the oviduct could be fertilized, but the second may not be. The unique yolk and embryo positioning is associated with low hatchability. These factors reduce the reproductive potential of DY egg yolks individually or cumulatively. Thus the above supports the view that DY eggs are nature’s ‘mistake’ and are viewed here as an extreme end of a normal distribution of variation and is unlikely to evolve further in avian species. However, there is still potential for further non-invasive research using DY eggs, especially in studies of factors affecting fertility.

Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry

O.OLGUN, A.Ö. YILDIZ and A. ŞAHIN

Cadmium is a heavy metal and non-essential for animals. In practice, cadmium toxicity is quite rare in farm animals because the level of cadmium in commercial diets is very low. However, cadmium-contaminated feedstuffs in the diet may cause toxicity. The cadmium, which is absorbed from digestive system, accumulates in the body tissues, primarily kidney and liver, and causes metabolic and physiological inconveniences in the body. Hereby, economic losses occur due to the decrease in feed intake and egg production. It will cause mortality depending on the level and duration of exposure to cadmium. The toxic level of cadmium varies according to the bird species and their ages. Chickens are more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than quails. Lower dietary cadmium doses (<10 mg/kg) have positive effects on production performance and eggshell quality, but higher doses of cadmium (>10 mg/kg) cause economic losses due to worsening productive performance and eggshell quality in poultry. Dietary zinc, selenium, vitamins and plant extracts will help to eliminate the negative consequences of cadmium contamination in feedstuff. However, further studies are needed to determine the toxic level of cadmium, and the possible positive effects of cadmium on performance and product quality when used at lower doses in poultry.

From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?

M. TIXIER-BOICHARD

The cumulated effects of domestication and subsequent selection by humans have led to an impressive diversification of the chicken, at the phenotypic level as well as the genome level. In theory, selection may reach a plateau when all favourable alleles have reached fixation. Yet, current data in poultry show that selection response can still take place after 50 generations of selection or more. The mechanisms maintaining selection response in closed populations may involve recombination, mutation and epistatic interactions. Furthermore, the continuous addition of new selection criteria can delay the possible limit associated to single trait selection. Thus, selection response is mainly threatened by inbreeding which occurs as a consequence of a narrow genetic base and/or a poor management of genetic variability within the population. Biological limits are encountered when selection is degrading fitness traits to a point that the survival of individuals is affected. Biological limits induced by extreme performance can be by-passed by adapting the breeding program, introducing new selection criteria, changing the management or developing remedial technologies. Extreme situations affecting bird welfare raise ethical issues. Lameness in broilers or spontaneous bone breakage in layers are painful and one may question whether such pain is justified by the human need for protein consumption. Regulations or market requirements may be set up to limit the performance at a level which is compatible with animal welfare, resulting in a voluntary limit to selection. Furthermore, highly performing animals need a very well controlled environment with high quality diets, which may divert food resources from humans and may not be sustainable. Breeding objectives have to integrate environmental impact and robustness towards the use of alternative feed sources, in addition to production level, product quality, health and welfare status.



Branch News

Austria

Conference on November 8th, 2019 - Successful conference in Upper Austria

On the 8th November 2019, the World Poultry Science Association (WPSA) Branch Austria held its second conference titled "Feeding, housing and management – challenges for the broiler industry regarding foot pad health” in Kremsmünster, Upper Austria. To the delight of the organisers, the event was fully booked.

More than 100 participants informed themselves in an interdisciplinary context about the multitude factors that lead to foot pad lesions and measures to prevent this problem.

The speakers highlighted the topic from various perspectives: aspects of health status, management, feeding and stable climate were discussed intensively by participants from the poultry industry, feed industry, research, veterinarians and practitioners.

Univ. Prof. Dr. Martin Gierus, Chairman of the WPSA Branch Austria, was pleased about the successful conference, which was attended by guests from Switzerland, Germany, The Netherlands and Austria: "The great response to our event shows the demand for a joint exchange within the entire poultry industry and confirmed the topic selection “foot pad health” as a current issue that finds exceptionally interest. We are pleased about the great concern, that reinforces our determination to continue with activities and to follow our goals as part of the WPSA.”

Prior to this event, the Austrian Branch also launched a new website http://www.wpsa-austria.at. With this new tool, online conference registration was possible and organization and communication with all members of the Austrian Branch will be improved.

Azerbaijan

On April 26, 2019, a Scientific-Practical Seminar on ‘Current Situation and Development Perspectives of Breeding Poultry’ was held at the Scientific-Research Institute of Animal Husbandry (SRIAH) with support of WPSA.

2020 december azerbaijanThe seminar was attended by representatives of the Goygol District Executive Authorities, the Ministry of Agriculture, members of the WPSA Azerbaijan branch, experts from ASAU, the Agriculture and Plant Protection research Institute, the Zoology and Veterinary Research Institutes, poultry experts, and representatives of large poultry factories (Mususlu, Sabah, Marcan broilers, Milas Agro), and farmers.

Speakers at the seminar made extensive reports on the current state of the industry, human resources, the industry’s primary problems, potential solutions for those problems, and prospects for industry development. Questions from the participants were answered.

The seminar was devoted to the development of poultry farming in progressive ways in the republic. Although it was on the eve of nearly full provision for our country in terms of eggs and poultry production, during the seminar many issues were considered. This seminar also presented the current situation for the global poultry sector and its future trends, and discusses the challenges the poultry sector is facing.

It was noted that the lack of poultry farms in the country and the development of poultry eggs in the republic did not fully meet the poultry development programme in the republic. The creation of new Breeding Farms was also considered as the most important issue of the day in order to eliminate the lack of breeding eggs in the country.

Eggs imported from the foreign countries due to the scarcity of hatching eggs in our country, sometimes bring with them pathogens that cause diseases. Thus, the quality of hatching eggs in the republic is one of the most important issues. It was noted that there is a great need for the help of competent organizations to resolve these issues.

During the seminar, it was emphasized that the demand for poultry meat in Azerbaijan has recently been almost completely taken care of with local production. Poultry farmers, however, face some difficulties, and most importantly, lack of breeder farms in the country.

Breeder farms have been established within some poultry companies. Simply these laboratories need special laboratories to detect the genetic potential of highly productive bird crosses. State-supported test stations are needed.

At the trial testing stations, the physiological characteristics of the birds living in an area of the Republic, and their resistance to diseases, and the level of breeding in the country should be checked, and then must be provided to the poultry producers. One of the challenges facing entrepreneurs is fodder production.

It is true that factories producing feed for poultry have been built in the Balakan, Imishli and Ganja regions of the country. Accordingly, a breeder research farm should be established in the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, and research work should be carried out in this direction, where selection and testing should be carried out. As a result, new bird crosses and lines, as well as breeds should be created, and they should be investigated to increase productivity. This work should be organized in Azerbaijan and our poultry scientists are ready for cooperation with scientists and other members of WPSA. The first problem of poultry sector in Azerbaijan is lack of breeder stock.

The most important areas for research is on those factors that decrease the cost of producing poultry, as well as on other factors that reduce other difficulties in this field, is that Azerbaijan does not have a breeding work.

It was noted that establishment of breeding farms is very costly, so it was necessary to establish breeder farms for producing hatching eggs and to support farmers with the production of healthy quality commercial chicks. It was also noted at the workshop that experience sharing should be widely used to strengthen human resources in the Breeding Farms.

The Azerbaijan branch of the World’s Poultry Science Association believes that cooperation, worldwide experience and support in breeding poultry will have positive influences on development of this field in our country.

November 18, 2019, Scientific-Practical Seminar ‘Innovative Approach in Poultry’ held at SRIAH with the support of WPSA.

On November 18, 2019 a scientific-practical seminar on ‘Innovative Approaches in Poultry’ was held at the Azerbaijan Scientific-Research Institute of Animal Husbandry of the Agrarian Science and Innovation Center through the support of the World Poultry Science Association. The seminar was attended by representatives of small and large poultry farms operating in different regions of the country, livestock farmers, ASAU students, research institutions and members of the Azerbaijan Branch of WPSA.

2020 december azerbaijan 2 2020 december azerbaijan 3
2020 december azerbaijan 4 2020 december azerbaijan 5

The Director of the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, Mahir Hajiyev, and also President of Azerbaijan’s WPSA Branch, opened the seminar referring to on-going reforms in the agricultural sector. He said that the implementation of intensive methods of meeting the population's demand for meat and meat products is of particular importance. In particular, the development of indoor and semi-enclosed poultry production as a new field for livestock production is based on modern world experience. At present, the number of birds in all economic categories in the country has exceeded 30,473,000, and the production of eggs exceeded 1 billion 676 million. Azerbaijan’s self-sufficiency for poultry production has increased significantly. . One of the important directions of scientific progress is the further development of poultry. Head of the Media Department at Agrarian Science and Innovation Center, Nicat Nasirli, spoke about the application of technological innovations in poultry, proper nutrition and marketing strategies.

Mete Turkoglu, an employee of the Igdir University of the Republic of Turkey, and Sevil Abbasguliyeva, Head of Laboratory at the Institute of Agriculture and Research, gave a presentation on innovative approaches in poultry farming. ASAU Professor and WPSA Azerbaijan Branch member, Arif Tagiyev gave the workshop participants some information about the economic importance of quail farms as a new direction for poultry farming. Rustam Gasimov, a veterinarian with Marjan Broiler LLC, stressed the importance of combating poultry diseases in captive birds. Giyas Hajiyev, Director of Mususlu Poultry LLC, stressed the importance of training qualified national personnel. As part of the workshop, the newly commissioned feed and milk analysis laboratories were reviewed at the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, and the participants were told how this modern machinery operated.

At the end of the workshop, members of WPSA’s Azerbaijan Branch expressed their intention to promote WPSA within Azerbaijan, and to organize future high level international events about Poultry Science in our country. Members of the branch also declared Giyas Hajiyev, as a new member of Azerbaijan Branch of WPSA.

2020 december azerbaijan 6

Mahir Hajiyev, Director of the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, and President of Azerbaijan branch WPSA,
Azerbaijan State Agrarian University, Veterinary Medicine and Zoo Engineering Faculty
e-mail: 
mahirhaciyev [AT] mail [DOT] ru

Brazil

FACTA held the 36th FACTA Conference, from 14-16 May 2019, at Expo D. Pedro, in Campinas (SP). This year around 350 people attended the conference, among them key opinion leaders, Professors, management level, veterinarians, students of post-graduations programmes and technicians, with relevant discussion about the present and future of the Brazilian poultry industry.

In Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, on 24-25 September 2019, the Ambience and Welfare in Poultry and Pig Industry Course was held, with 160 attendants. The event aimed to bring together and discuss the most updated information on animal welfare and ambience.

FACTA moved their administrative headquarters to Barão de Paranapanema Street, 146, Bosque, room 72, block A - Ed. Campinas Commercial Center. Phone: 55 19 3255-8500.

From 25-27 November 2019, FACTA will promote in Recife, Pernambuco, the event: International on incubation of eggs and Broiler.

The next FACTA Conference, 37th edition will be held from 12-14 May 2020, at Expo D. Pedro, in Campinas (SP). This year's theme will be ‘One Health’, in partnership with FENAGRA.

France

World's Poultry Congress 2020

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

WPC2020 (August, 16-20, 2020) will take place in PARIS, and will have the objective of ‘Integrating knowledge for sustainable and diversified poultry productions’. A detailed scientific programme has been developed by the international Scientific Committee. On days 1 and 4, plenary lectures will address global challenges. On days 2 and 3, parallel sessions will feature at least four multidisciplinary ‘object oriented’ sessions in the morning and up to seven specialized sessions in the afternoon. Several early sponsors are already supporting the event and further applications are welcome.

Abstract submission and early bird registration to WPC2020 opened on September 1st and will end on December 31st, 2019. See the WPC2020 website( https://www.wpcparis2020.com/ ) for detailed information.

The board of the French Branch of the WPSA, based on the success of the WPSA European Symposium on Poultry Genetics (ESPG) in 2017 decided to offer a grant of 1.500 € to the Czech Branch for the ESPG congress in Prague that was held in 2019. The board is pleased to receive the following feed-back from Pawel Trefil that the 2019 congress was a great success. Here are his words:

“Dear Dr Michele Tixier Boichard and all members of French branch of WPSA, I would like to express my gratitude to you. Our Czech branch was able to organize the ESPG 2019 in Prague with your great financial support. I am sure that you and all of your members understand, that without your help it would not have been possible to execute it. According to my feeling, the symposium was successful and I would like to express to your branch our big gratitude for your support! Thank you! The symposium in Prague was financially balanced and we are happy not to end up in red numbers!”

Those of us on the board of the French Branch of WPSA think that it is our duty to support, if possible, the other branches to continue to fulfil our own mission of disseminating the scientific progress for the poultry industry. We are really pleased to see that collaboration and brotherhood between branches can be a reality.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, WPSA France 
frcbos [AT] chr-hansen [DOT] com

Germany

The Spring Conference of the German Branch will take place on March 10 -11, 2020, jointly at the Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Dummerstorf, and at the University of Rostock. Abstracts for poster contributions are welcome. Based on their topic and scientific achievements, up to three of the abstracts submitted will be invited for oral presentation and publication. German members will soon receive official invitations to this meeting. Foreign members who might be interested in attending are welcome to contact the branch secretary, Inga Tiemann (inga [DOT] tiemann [AT] uni-bonn [DOT] de).

The German Branch of the WPSA took an excursion to Brittany during September 2019. Every two years, the Branch organizes such an excursion, mostly in conjunction with the occasion of international conferences that are being held. This year’s group visited the SPACE in Rennes, France. Visits were made to two organic farms, Lable Rouge and Loué chickens, which gave a broad and special insight into French poultry farming. Our thanks to the German and French organisers!

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, German Branch

Israel

The 54th Annual Poultry Science Conference of the Israeli Branch was held at the Dan Panorama Hotel in Tel Aviv on November 18-19, 2019. The conference was attended by 550 participants: scientists and students from academia and research institutes, poultry producers, veterinarians, extension specialists and professionals from commercial companies serving the poultry industry in Israel.

During the 2-day conference, 50 lectures were presented in 10 sessions covering the leading poultry science disciplines: Nutrition; Management; Environment protection; Health; Immunology; Genetics, Reproduction, Incubation and Fertility; Layers production; and Broiler production and breast meat quality. The detailed programme (in English) is available here.

The closing session ended with a lively round table discussion, focusing on the challenge of balancing the demand for broiler meat and products, with the over-production capacity of broilers in Israel.

The conference was honoured to host an overseas guest speaker, Dr M. Tixier-Boichard from France, who shared her extensive knowledge and vast experience in the field of poultry genetics and breeding.

An award of appreciation was given to Elisha Tishbi for his contributions to the field of Turkey Production and for his activities over the years in the WPSA-Israeli Branch. For the past four years, he has served as the chairperson of the Branch's audit committee.

Twenty five Israeli companies exhibited unique products for the poultry industry: including pharmaceuticals, feed additives, housing equipment, climate control, etc. The evening social activities included a lecture on current Israeli issues by a popular journalist. In addition, three students were awarded prizes for their research presentations. Twenty five council members were approved by the general assembly for the next 4 years. The new council will soon appoint new Officers and the Executive Board for the Israel branch.

Yitzhak Malka, Secretary, WPSA Israel Branch

Italy

2021 espn

The Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from September 20th to 23rd 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

This event will be launched on next year by organizing the 56th Annual Congress of the Italian Branch of WPSA in the same location (April 24th, 2020).

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA
<info [AT] wpsa [DOT] it>

Japan

The Autumn Meeting of JPSA, 2019 was held at the Iwate University in Morioka, Iwate, during 16–17 September. There were more than 120 attendees. The scientific meeting was consisted of 37 original research presentations and a mini-international symposium. A general meeting and a council meeting were also held. The council meeting was held as the joint committee meeting on September 16. The scientific talks and the general meeting were organized on September 17.

In the Autumn Meeting, the excellent presentation awards were given under the category of ‘student member’ or ‘regular member aged 30 or below’ for the following presentations: 1) “Development of anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein IgY by plasmid immunization” by Nanase Kubo (Kyoto Women’s University); 2) “Changes in glucose metabolism function of yolk sac membrane during development of chick embryo” by Mitsuhiro Shibata (UGSAS, Gifu University); and 3) “Changes in amino acid concentrations in broiler chickens under chronic heat-stressed condition” by Daiki Igarashi (Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University). JPSA congratulates the presenters who achieved the excellent presentation awards in the Autumn Meeting 2019.

The mini-international symposium was held on September 17, after the original scientific presentations. It was entitled “Future prospective and issues in Japanese poultry science research – Recent update in research on the development engineering”. Dr Shusei Mizushima, Hokkaido University, made the opening remarks. Then, Dr Hong-Jian Wei from College of Veterinary Medicine, Yunnan Agricultural University, and Dr Yuki Sato from Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, offered their lectures. The titles of lectures were “Current status of local livestock and poultry genetics conservation in China” and “Chicken and quail embryos are attractive model system for experimental developmental biology”, respectively. After the lectures, a free discussion was held.

In this Meeting, the JPSA ‘Incentive Award’ was presented to Dr Daichi Miyahara, Shinshu University. His research topic was “Research about the culture methods for Chicken PGCs”. Moreover, the ‘Excellent Paper Award’ on the published papers in the Journal of Poultry Science in 2018 was presented in this meeting. Bapon Dey, Fuminori Kawabata, Yuko Kawabata, Shotaro Nishimura, and Shoji Tabata, entitled “Bitter taste sensitivity and the expression of bitter taste receptors at different growth stages of chicks”, 55 (3): 204–209, and Chuen-Yu Cheng,Wei-Lin Tu, Chao-Jung Chen, Hong-Lin Chan, Chic-Feng Chen, Hsin-Hsin Chen, Pin-Chi Tang, Yen-Pai Lee, Shuen-Ei Chen, and San-Yuan Huang, entitled “Proteomic' analysis of thermal regulation of small yellow follicles in broiler-type Taiwan country chickens”, 55 (2): 120-136 were given the awards.

The 2020 Spring Meeting of JPSA will be held at Kyoto University in Kyoto, during 27–28 March. The meeting will contain an open symposium, council and general meetings. The theme of the symposium will be “The needs of Ph.D. status in the industries”. It will be a joint symposium with Japan Animal Science Association. The detail information will be provided at JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/oshirase/?lang=en).

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS, the official journal of JPSA, Impact Factor: 0.670) always welcomes the submission of reviews and original papers. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the published articles.

JPSA would like to contribute to the poultry science in Japan and over the world by enhancing the international activities with the members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as “Special International Member”. The page charges to publish their papers in the JPS will be set at a membership price. JPSA invariably welcome new members from all over the world. Please visit JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

Lebanon

The Lebanon Branch of WPSA held its annual meeting on October 5, 2019, at the Lancaster Hotel in Hazmieh, a suburb of Beirut, Lebanon. The meeting was attended by nearly all members as well as guests, totalling over 65 people. It was chaired by the President of the Branch, Dr Nuhad J. Daghir who welcomed the group and spoke about the upcoming conferences in Cordoba, Spain, in March 2020, and the WPC 2020, in Paris, France. He then introduced the secretary of the Branch, Dr Nada Usayran, who presented the branch’s report and the treasurer Mr. Samir Cortbawi, who presented the financial report. Both reports were unanimously approved by the members. The business meeting was then followed by the scientific program as shown below:

  1. From Farm to Fork: Assessment of Microbiological Acceptability of Skinless Chicken Breasts and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia Coli associated with Lebanese poultry – Presented by Dr Issmat Kassem, American University of Beirut.
  2. Comparison between imported and locally produced SBM and its possible replacement with Safflower meal – Presented by Dr Mohamad Farran, American university of Beirut
  3. Industry Presentations:
    • Mr. Elie Srour from SHD, sal: Solvent extracted Soybean meal.
    • Mr. Mohamad Sinno from ZM Vegetable Oil industries, sal: High oil SBM

Presentations were followed by a discussion which lasted for one hour on all the topics presented and then all those attending were invited to lunch at the Hotel which was sponsored by SHD, one of the participating companies.

Dr Nadad Usayran, Branch Secretary

South Africa

2019 december SA 2The South African branch held its annual Scientific Day on 30 October 2019. The theme was ‘Enhancing Poultry Production,’ and the programme was started by Izaak Breitenbach, the general manager of the Broiler Organisation of the South African Poultry Association. He discussed the latest figures on imports and local production, and he presented his calculations on the necessary tariffs to keep the local Industry afloat. Those tariffs have been incorporated into the Poultry Master Plan.

We were fortunate to have a number of international speakers. Prof Richard Ducatelle from the University of Ghent, and Dr Wolfgang Siegert from the University of Hohenheim, each gave two presentations. Prof Ducatelle discussed the area of gut microbiota, and Dr Siegert talked about the role of glycine and serine as well as phytate degradation and phytase efficiency. Edward Diehl, from Cobb in the Netherlands, made another presentation on the latest developments in broiler nutrition. The day was also made richer by a local speaker, Rick Kleyn, and we enjoyed feedback and presentations from 4 local University students who presented results of their own research projects.

The branch also organized a successful Youth Programme, where the top students from local Universities had a 3 day tour of Poultry Facilities, their last day being spent attending the Scientific day (see pic). Attendance for the Scientific day was at a record high of 375 people.

2019 december SA 1

We sincerely thank all of our sponsors for this successful Scientific Day event.

Nicola Tyler, Secretary, South African branch

Sri Lanka

The Annual General Meeting of the Sri Lanka Branch was held on 27th September 2019, and the new committee took up office with Dr Vipula Dharmawardene as President. On the same day, the Annual Scientific Sessions & Industrial Evening were held at the Upper Crystal Ball Room, Hotel Taj Samudra, in Colombo.

Dr Ruwani Kalupahana served as the Chairperson for the Scientific Sessions.

Seven papers were presented as follows:

  • Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat.
  • Detection of ESBL producing E. coli from local chicken and related products ;preliminary results of an ongoing study.
  • Efficacy of locally developed SPA antigen and In-House ELISA comparing kits for screening of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in poultry.
  • Effect of Bitter Gourd seeds on Egg yolk colour in the Hyline strain of White Leghorn laying hens.
  • Effects of Dietary Active Dried Yeast and a phytogenic growth promoter on production performance, nutrient digestibility, visceral organ weights and serum lipid profile of broiler chicken.
  • Quality attributes of jerky prepared with different forms of chicken meat.
  • The Impact of Biochar on Phosphorus losses from three types of broiler litter material.

Industrial Evening

2019 december Sri lanka 1The Chief Guest for this occasion was Dr Roel Mulder, the Secretary General of WPSA.

Dr Mrs Renuka Jayatissa, Head of the Nutrition Department, Medical Research Institute, Consultant Medical Nutritionist, and President Sri Lanka Medical Nutrition association gave the Keynote Address on the theme: ‘Farm to Table – Quality Assurance of poultry products’.

The highlight of the Evening was the awarding of an Honorary Life membership in the World’s Poultry Science Association’s Sri Lanka branch to Dr Chin How Cheong, who is the Founder of the branch.

Dr Mrs A L Godwin, Secretary, Sri Lanka Branch

United Kingdom

The 33rd Poultry Science Symposium: ‘Pre and probiotics, nutrition, veterinary and production perspectives.’ will be held at Clare College, University of Cambridge, UK on 10 -12 August 2020.

The UK branch invites you to an interesting and current programme of world leading experts, that will discuss the nutritional, veterinary and production perspectives for the use of pre- and probiotics in poultry production. The scientific committee has arranged an exciting programme. The symposiums intention is to provide a thorough look at the antibiotic free sector from various perspectives, followed by good discussions about what we can do as professionals to maintain good gut and overall bird health. Topics will include an overview of AGPs, how they work and the challenges that occur in their absence, thorough definitions of additives in the pre and probiotic space and examples of how those probiotics work. How to test them, and how they interact with other additives will also be discussed, learning from our own and allied sectors. Poster submissions on related topics will be invited, with the submission portal opening on 1st January 2020. Further information, speakers and session information can be found at https://www.wpsa2020.org/. We look forward to seeing you there!

New Opportunity: The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award

The UK branch is pleased to announce a new Academic Career Advancement Award in memory of Professor Gordon D Rosen. Gordon contributed a highly logical and very descriptive approach to animal nutrition from the 1960s through to just a few years before his death in 2015. A full obituary for him is available in volume 71 of World’s Poultry Science Journal. He was an inspirational person whose curiosity and gently framed yet penetrating questions made him a legend. There is a generation of scientists influenced by his presence – always in the front row – of scientific meetings, and now his wife Vanda would like to encourage other scientists to develop their own inquisitiveness through this new award.

The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award provides £2000 each year to fund an academic adventure. With this aim, the award is open in nature, while particularly encouraging people to become multidisciplinary in their approach to research. The award is open to UK branch members who are within their early career spanning from 2 years to 5 years post PhD viva. Examples of proposals might include a request to attend an academic conference (particularly one outside your core field), support for an educational tour of another country or global region, support to visit another institution to learn a new technique or approach, or support to publish a major research output in a journal requiring publication fees.

Proposal forms and conditions of the GD Rosen Award can be found on the WPSA-UK website.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 30th January 2020

Dr Emily Burton
Associate Professor in Sustainable Food Production
School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences
Nottingham Trent University, Brackenhurst Campus
Nottingham NG25 0QF, United Kingdom
Office phone: +44 (0)115 848 5346
Mobile phone: +44 (0)773 9988022

USA

The USA Branch has again conducted the Cliff Carpenter Student Essay Contest for providing financial support for 3 winning students to attend the 2020 World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France. The Branch will also be providing Travel Grants for USA Branch members to attend WPC2020 who will be making oral or poster presentations.Dr Bob Buresh, Secretary, USA Branch

 

March 2020 Newsletter

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
Volume 50, March 2020  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein, ghavenst [AT] ncsu [DOT] edu 

 

2020 wpc  

World's Poultry Congres 2020

16-20 August, Paris, France

Scholarship Awards

During the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France in 2020 Scholarship Awards for respectively the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award and the WPSA Education Award are going to be presented. Deadline for submissions was 1st March 2020.
To show how awards are utilized, those nominated must, if successful, undertake to present a report of their work at the next World’s Poultry Congress following the one at which the award was made.

International Poultry Hall of Fame

Selection of candidates for the International Poultry Hall of Fame have been finalised. The new inductees will be presented during the Opening Ceremony.

Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay Competition

At the latest Board meeting, held during the Poultry Science Association (PSA) meeting in Montréal, Canada, it was decided to start the Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay competition.
Five travel awards ($2000 each) will be made available on a competitive basis to full time graduate students for attendance at the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France, 16-20 August 2020. The original essay of up to 2000 words should address the topic ‘The possible role of the World’s Poultry Science Association in education’. The 5 winners should come from different continents, they have to be a member in 2019 and must be between the ages of 18-30.
The applications for the International Cliff D. Carpenter Essay competition are currently being evaluated.

Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC)

Preparations are underway for the formation of a Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC), which committee is in charge of seeking candidates for the WPSA Board 2020-2024. The NAC will be chaired by Dr Mamduh Sifri. Branches and members can propose candidates for the offices of President, five Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer.
Further information can be found in the WPSA Constitution and By-laws (Constitution article IV-5 and By-Laws article II-8 through 11).

Council Meeting

During the Council meeting the city and country for the next World’s Poultry Congress in 2024 will be selected. The candidate cities are: Cape Town proposed by the South Africa branch and Toronto proposed by the Canada, Mexico and USA branches.
Also a new Board will be selected during the Council Meeting. Each Branch, in good financial standing, is eligible to vote. The number of votes per branch depends on the number of members on December 1st of the year preceding the vote (see the Constutition and By-Laws).
All members are invited to attend the Council Meeting.

Updates on the above mentioned topics will be publsihed on the WPSA website under the heading !! WPC2020 !!.

   

Registration for WPC2020

Registration for WPC2020 are open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

World’s Poultry Congress, Palais de Congrès, August 16 – 20, 2020, Paris, France

Information on the programme of WPC2020 can be found on www.wpcparis2020.com
Preparations are underway for the Council meeting during the next WPC.
During the Council meeting the city and country for the next World’s Poultry Congress in 2024 will be selected. The candidate cities are: Cape Town proposed by the South Africa branch and Toronto proposed by the Canada, Mexico and USA branches.
Selection of candidates for the International Poultry Hall of Fame have been finalised. The applications for the International Cliff D. Carpenter Essay competition are currently being evaluated.
Deadlines for application for the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award and the WPSA Education Award are approaching.
The Nominating Advisory Committee (NAS), which is in charge of seeking candidates for WPSA’s 2020-2024 Board of Directors has started its activities. Branches and members can now propose candidates for the 2020-2024 Board of directors.

WPSA presence at exhibitions and conferences

WPSA leadership members were present at IPPE, Atlanta, USA, during January 2020. Other events that will have WPSA presence include VIV MEA, Abu Dhabi, UAE and Victam Asia, and Animal Health and Nutrition, Bangkok, Thailand, as well as the Mediterranean Poultry Summit, 25-27 March 2020, Cordoba, Spain. Information on the programme for the Mediterranean Summit can be found on www.mpn-wpsa.org/spain2020 and www.wpsa.com 
The 1st Poultry Nutrition symposium 25-26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand has been postponed because of the Covid-19 virus.
During the above listed symposia and conferences, promotional materials for WPSA, the World’s Poultry Science Journal, WPC 2020 in Paris, France, and other upcoming conferences and events will be on display.
WPSA members and any other interested individuals are invited to attend the above events where they meet many other WPSA members and leadership representatives.

WPSA World’s Poultry Science Journal

The March 2020 issue of the World’s Poultry Science Journal, is being hosted and produced by Taylor & Francis Publishers, and is on track.

WPSA programmes

WPSA has several programmes to support members and branches. Details on the Travel Grant programmes, the Speakers’ Bureau programme, and on proposals for Branch Development can be found on the WPSA website. Criteria for eligibility for these programmes are published together with the (different) deadlines for the individual programmes. Please follow the instructions, as inaccurate, incomplete and late applications have to be rejected.

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH)

The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization organises training courses on poultry (for 3 à 4 weeks) in several countries. Additional details are provided on www.wvepah.org. All joint activities with WVEPAH will also be announced on our WPSA website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder, General Secretary

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

Since my last report, I had the pleasure of attending the International Production and Processing Exposition (IPPE) in Atlanta, Georgia. IPPE redesigned two of the exhibition floors this year and WPSA was lucky to be given a booth near the extremely popular food court. The proximity to food, plus the neighbouring booths of other scientific societies and institutions, brought us excellent foot traffic. The other members of the Executive Committee (EC): Drs. Ning Yang, Roel Mulder, and Bob Buresh, joined me in the booth. We greeted WPSA members, officers, as well as financial supporters of our Journal, from around the globe.
The EC held a productive meeting in Atlanta and discussed time sensitive topics, including WPC2020-Paris. We were delighted to learn of the large number of applications for the Young Scientist Programme in Paris. The EC decided that in addition to the support already pledged by the global body, WPSA would match the French Branch in funding an additional 10 Young Scientists.

I am pleased to report that I have forwarded all of the 2019 financial records and tax information to WPSA’s Certified Public Accountant (CPA). I will be working with the CPA and his staff in the coming months to finalise the WPSA tax returns.

As I close this report, I will start packing for a USA west coast trade association meeting in Hawaii. At that event I coordinated the programmes for the poultry students, and their programmes are generously sponsored by the United States Branch of WPSA.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer

26th World's Poultry Congress

Palais de Congrès,

August 16-20, 2020, Paris, France

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

It is with great pleasure that the French branch of WPSA invites you to attend the 26th World Poultry Congress in Paris, from 16-20 August 2020. We have prepared an attractive Congress for the benefit of the large number of participants that are coming from all over the world. The scientific programme will be highly interactive and interdisciplinary, with the objective of ‘Integrating knowledge for sustainable and diversified poultry productions’. The Mediterranean and African Poultry Networks will hold specific sessions, and a symposium will take place under the auspices of FAO. As usual for a WPC, Youth and Young Scientist programmes will be held.

Exhibition and sponsoring: the programme includes an exhibition that allows companies to display their company information and products within the Congress Centre, and the Congress programme will include a number of technical symposia as well.

Registration: We received nearly 1000 early bird registrations before December 31st, 2019. Registration will continue at the regular price until March 31st, 2020, and at an increased price thereafter.

Abstracts: The submission of abstracts closed on January 5th, 2020. More than 1400 abstracts were received and are currently under evaluation. Acceptance results and notifications for the abstracts are expected to occur sometime during March 2020.

Sessions and Invited speakers: Sessions will last from Sunday afternoon, 16th of August, to Thursday morning, the 20th of August. Renowned speakers from all over the world will be involved in both the plenary lectures and in the parallel sessions. Their addresses have been assigned to one of the following topic sessions: Nutrition, Breeding and Genetics, Egg Quality, Poultry Meat Quality, Reproduction, Hygiene and Pathology, Poultry Welfare and Management, Physiology, Education and Information, Waterfowl, and Turkeys. For detailed information about the WPC registration and programme, see the Congresses website: http://www.wpcparis2020.com/.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President French Branch
Michael Duclos, Secretary, French Branch
Michèle Tixier Boichard, WPC2020, Programme Coordinator

 

Newly Compiled List of Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl

 

European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2021. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espnThe Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from September 20-23, 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the symposium website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

WG3

Breeding and Genetics

The 11th European Symposium on Poultry Genetics was held in Prague from 23 to 25 October 2019. The symposium was hosted by the Czech branch of WPSA and organised together with Working Group 3 'Breeding and Genetics' of the European Federation of WPSA. The 3-day symposium was very well attended, and 141 scientists from 30 countries participated. The scientific programme included sessions on new breeding technologies, genomic selection, current topics on dual-purpose chickens, genetic diversity, microbiota, new breeding targets for poultry species and the breeding of other bird species. A total of 25 invited speakers presented the latest results of their current research, which were discussed in various ways. Furthermore, scientists presented their work in 46 posters.
A particular highlight of the Symposium was a special session in which four young scientists had the opportunity to present their work in a short oral presentation. Working Group 3 endeavours to support young scientists in this way by covering the registration fees for the selected presenters. The symposium took place in a very pleasant and productive atmosphere and gave the participants the opportunity for an intensive exchange of ideas in a variety of ways. On behalf of the working group, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all participants, colleagues and helpers involved in preparing the symposium as well as our sponsors, who made a significant contribution to the success of the symposium.

The 12th symposium is already being planned. It will take place in Hannover from 26 - 28 October 2021, and will be hosted by the German Branch. We would be pleased if you saved this date and planned your participation. Further information will follow in due course.

Steffen Weigend, Chairman of the European Federations Working Group 3

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQ

The XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat will be conjointly held with the XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products from June 21 to 23, 2021, in Kraków, Poland. Please visit http://www.eggmeat2021.com/ to keep yourself updated. Special reduced registration fees will be available for WPSA members and students. We will look forward to seeing many of you there. Prominent invited speakers from American and European Institutions will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production. A new website will be developed and registration information will be provided in the near future.

Most WG5 members will also be participating in the 2020 World's Poultry Congress in Paris, France on August 16-20, and the scientific programme of the two parallel sessions dealing with 'Meat Quality' is almost defined under supervision of the WG5 group in connection with the Scientific Committee of which WG5 chairperson is a part. During the Paris Congress, a meeting of Working Group 5 has also been planned during WPC2020, and it will take place on Wednesday, August 19th. See the Congress Programme for the meeting time and location.


Asia Pacific Federation

2020 apf poultry nutrition symposium

Postponing the Asia Pacific Federation (APF) Poultry Nutrition Symposium

Because of the COVID-19 (Corona Virus) outbreak, which is a great concern worldwide, travelling to mass gatherings can be a risk for travellers, including the spread of an infection.
After discussions with the Organising Committee of the APF Poultry Nutrition Symposium and the Thai Government, the President of the Asia Pacific Federation, Dr Sakchai Sriboonsue, has decided to postpone the meeting, which was scheduled for 25-26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand, until further notice.

The Organising Committee would like to apologize for any inconvenience this causes to the sponsors and attendees.

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

The Ratite Working Group will hold a general meeting on the 18th of March at 10:00 on the Oudtshoorn Research Farm, Oudtshoorn, South Africa. All are welcome to attend.

The next meeting is scheduled to take place at the World Poultry Congress in Paris, France that is being held 16-20 August 2020. Please let us know if you are planning to attend the meeting and Congress, as well as any topics that you would like to have considered, by sending an email to anele [AT] elsenburg [DOT] com.

Anel Engelbrecht, Chair

7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

The Mediterranean Poultry Network will host the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit at the University of Cordoba in Cordoba, Spain, on March 25-27, 2020. Details for the conference are shown on the website summit’s website: www.mpn-wpsa.org. The Registration Deadline for the Summit is March 25 2020.

 

World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you have received an email from Taylor & Francis with instructions how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact support [AT] tandfonline [DOT] com”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • M. Tixier-Boichard - From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?
  • A. Salamon - The double-yolked egg: from the 'miracle of packaging' to nature's 'mistake'
  • L. Sarmiento-Franco - Do free-range systems have potential to improve broiler welfare in the tropics?
  • S.S. Elnesr - Impact of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and epigallocatechin gallate on poultry
  • O. Olgun - Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry
  • S.U. Mahfuz - Role of certain mushrooms on growth performance and physiological responses in broiler chickens
  • T.R. Kannaki - Marek's disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian poultry
  • J.L. Angove - The avian maternal environment: exploring the physiological mechanisms driving progeny performance
  • J.-J. Chen - Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat strss in chickens in the humid tropics
  • O. Olgun - Use of alfalfa meal in layer diets – a review
  • H. Hamadani - Characteristics of the Kashmir Anz geese breed
  • K.M. Hartcher - Genetic selection of broilers and welfare consequences: a review

Summaries

From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?

M. TIXIER-BOICHARD

The cumulated effects of domestication and subsequent selection by humans have led to an impressive diversification of the chicken, at the phenotypic level as well as the genome level. In theory, selection may reach a plateau when all favourable alleles have reached fixation. Yet, current data in poultry show that selection response can still take place after 50 generations of selection or more. The mechanisms maintaining selection response in closed populations may involve recombination, mutation and epistatic interactions. Furthermore, the continuous addition of new selection criteria can delay the possible limit associated to single trait selection. Thus, selection response is mainly threatened by inbreeding which occurs as a consequence of a narrow genetic base and/or a poor management of genetic variability within the population. Biological limits are encountered when selection is degrading fitness traits to a point that the survival of individuals is affected. Biological limits induced by extreme performance can be by-passed by adapting the breeding programme, introducing new selection criteria, changing the management or developing remedial technologies. Extreme situations affecting bird welfare raise ethical issues. Lameness in broilers or spontaneous bone breakage in layers are painful and one may question whether such pain is justified by the human need for protein consumption. Regulations or market requirements may be set up to limit the performance at a level which is compatible with animal welfare, resulting in a voluntary limit to selection. Furthermore, highly performing animals need a very well controlled environment with high quality diets, which may divert food resources from humans and may not be sustainable. Breeding objectives have to integrate environmental impact and robustness towards the use of alternative feed sources, in addition to production level, product quality, health and welfare status.

The double-yolked egg: from the ‘miracle of packaging’ to nature’s ‘mistake’

A. SALAMON and J.P. KENT

Double-yolked (DY) eggs were mostly described in domestic prosocial species, and are rarely found in nature. It is estimated that 1-3% of domestic hen and duck eggs are DY.

DY eggs occur when two yolks are encapsulated in a single shell and therefore differ from SY eggs in their external and internal characteristics. In previous decades DY eggs were distinguished from SY eggs only by their external characteristics, and this proved to be wrong, as over 40% of DY eggs have similar external characteristics in terms of size and shape to SY eggs. The internal characteristics of DY eggs constrain their fertility. Yolks in DY eggs tend to be smaller, probably ovulated early and are thus immature, having a significant negative impact on their reproductive potential with lower fertility levels. Further, the presence of a second yolk facilitates additional albumen secretion with the size of each yolk determining the additional amount secreted. This creates a primacy effect, i.e. the first yolk in the oviduct could be fertilized, but the second may not be. The unique yolk and embryo positioning is associated with low hatchability. These factors reduce the reproductive potential of DY egg yolks individually or cumulatively. Thus the above supports the view that DY eggs are nature’s ‘mistake’ and are viewed here as an extreme end of a normal distribution of variation and is unlikely to evolve further in avian species. However, there is still potential for further non-invasive research using DY eggs, especially in studies of factors affecting fertility.

Do free-range systems have potential to improve broiler welfare in the tropics?

R. SÁNCHEZ-CASANOVA, L. SARMIENTO-FRANCO, C. PHILLIPS and Z. IDRUS

An insight into the impact of free-range systems on the main welfare problems for commercial-line broiler chicken production in tropical regions is provided. Much research has been conducted to mitigate the impact of conventional production systems on broilers welfare, but nearly all of these studies are based on the development of strategies to improve performance parameters in temperate regions, making it difficult to implement such approaches in tropical environments. Stocking density is one of the main housing variables that influences the birds’ development. Optimal stocking density ranges from 25 kg to 40 kg liveweight per m2, with no less than 1 m2 of outdoor area per bird in some cases, for a minimum of 8 hours of free-range access per day, according to welfare legislations in different jurisdictions worldwide. Several studies with commercial-line broiler chickens have shown that they are adapted to the environmental characteristics of tropical regions if temperature is below 30°C, relative humidity levels below 80% inside the housing and stocking density does not exceed 30 kg/m2. Therefore, Latin America has great potential for the implementation of free-range production system. The use of local resources, like forage plants for feed and natural materials with good thermal insulation properties for housing construction could be a good alternative to make this system feasible. C4 plants present in tropical ecosystems have a very high rate of water-use efficiency in temperatures between 30-35°C, which may increase the productivity of crops, fodder and pastures. Those plants are a good option to stimulate ranging in chickens, due to both their abilities as covering crop and fast growing. The review concludes that outdoor access has potential to improve broiler welfare in tropical regions, but it is still necessary to develop standards and regulations that ensure its proper functioning and, consequently, chickens’ welfare.

Impact of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and epigallocatechin gallate on poultry

M.E. ABD EL-HACK, S.S. ELNESR, M. ALAGAWANY, A. GADO, A.E. NORELDIN and A.A. GABR

Green tea is of interest due to its high content of pharmacologically active ingredients such as catechins, flavanols, flavadiols, flavonoids and phenolic acids. Green tea contains many polyphenolic compounds such as epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate. The inclusion of green tea as a feed additive has been shown to improve growth performance and overall health of poultry. Previous studies have shown different results in the rate of improvement in body weight (between 1-10%) with the use of different doses of green tea (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 mg/kg) in the diet. Using 1-2 mg green tea per kg in the broiler diet improved feed conversion ratio (FCR) by approximately 8%. Abdominal fat was decreased by 10-20% using 0.2-1.0% green tea extract in broiler diets. Improvements in egg production, egg mass and feed conversion values with inclusion rates of 1% green tea in feed, compared to a negative control, have been reported to be 5.6%, 6.8% and 7.8%, respectively. Green tea may improve the antioxidant status of poultry. Epigallocatechin gallate has been found to be over 100 times more effective in neutralising free radicals than vitamin C and 25 times more powerful than vitamin E.

Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry

O.OLGUN, A.Ö. YILDIZ and A. ŞAHIN

Cadmium is a heavy metal and non-essential for animals. In practice, cadmium toxicity is quite rare in farm animals because the level of cadmium in commercial diets is very low. However, cadmium-contaminated feedstuffs in the diet may cause toxicity. The cadmium, which is absorbed from digestive system, accumulates in the body tissues, primarily kidney and liver, and causes metabolic and physiological inconveniences in the body. Hereby, economic losses occur due to the decrease in feed intake and egg production. It will cause mortality depending on the level and duration of exposure to cadmium. The toxic level of cadmium varies according to the bird species and their ages. Chickens are more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than quails. Lower dietary cadmium doses (<10 mg/kg) have positive effects on production performance and eggshell quality, but higher doses of cadmium (>10 mg/kg) cause economic losses due to worsening productive performance and eggshell quality in poultry. Dietary zinc, selenium, vitamins and plant extracts will help to eliminate the negative consequences of cadmium contamination in feedstuff. However, further studies are needed to determine the toxic level of cadmium, and the possible positive effects of cadmium on performance and product quality when used at lower doses in poultry.

Role of certain mushrooms on growth performance and physiological responses in broiler chickens

S.U. MAHFUZ, S.F. LONG and X.S. PIAO

Supplementing broiler diets with medicinal mushrooms is considered an effective alternative to prophylactic antibiotics. Feeding certain mushrooms may have beneficial effects on gut health in broilers, whereby trials have shown weight gain was increased about 5.2% when feeding 5% of the Hericium caput-medusae mushrooms in the diet. Both Salmonella spp. and E. coli numbers in the caecum were significantly lowered from 5.036 to 3.031 log10 CFU/g and from 5.405 to 4.759 log10 CFU/g when 50 g/kg or 30 g/kg of Flammulina velutipes mushrooms were included in feed, respectively, compared to an unsupplemented control group. Beneficial bacteria (Lactobacilli spp.) were found in significantly higher numbers (increased from 6.45 to 8.05 log10 CFU/g) and Bifidobacter spp. (increased from 6.28 to 7.77 log10 CFU/g of content) in the caecum of broilers fed 20 g/kg mushrooms (Agaricus biosporus) in feed. However, there is still disagreement in published articles on the dosages and mode of action of medicinal mushrooms in broilers. The following review covered the published trials investigating the uses of medicinal fungi on growth performance, meat quality and health status in broiler to date, and showed. that supplementation with medicinal fungi may have a role on the immunity, health and growth performance in broiler.

Marek’s disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian Poultry

T.R. KANNAKI and V. GOWTHAMAN

Marek’s disease (MD) is one of the re-emerging diseases in Indian poultry. MD outbreaks are reported from different parts of the country in spite of vaccination, causing major economic losses. Flock mortality of 10-40% was observed in vaccinated flocks during outbreaks, although MD is well controlled with vaccination. Almost 100% of the commercial poultry flocks are vaccinated at hatchery level. Bivalent (HVT+SB1 or HVT+301B/1) or monovalent (HVT) vaccines are used in India. In spite of the intensive vaccination practice, outbreaks are being reported from different parts of the world including India. MD virus (MDV) Indian field isolates from different outbreaks during last decade are categorised into virulent (vMDV) and very virulent (vvMDV) pathotypes based on different serotype 1 specific gene sequencing and in vivo pathotyping. The emergence of virulence in MDV is attributed to compromised bio-security, concurrent immunosuppressive diseases and vaccination failure. MD outbreaks in vaccinated flocks of Indian poultry flocks cause annual loss of approximately 4 crore Indian rupees. Country-wide surveillance and reporting of MD outbreaks and further characterization of the Indian field isolate should be taken as a priority. Reviewing the current vaccination strategy, and examining the need for the introduction of more effective vaccines that give better protection against the more virulent strains should be considered with equal importance along with improved bio-security measures, management practices and more effective control of immunosuppressive diseases.

The avian maternal environment: exploring the physiological mechanisms driving progeny performance

J.L. ANGOVE and R.E.A. FORDER

Environmental factors, both positive and negative, experienced by breeder hens during their reproductive life, can have a significant influence on the productive efficiency and health of their progeny. This is particularly important considering that commercial broilers spend a significant proportion of their life in ovo, and alterations to the in ovo environment can permanently ‘programme’ progeny endocrine pathways. The maternal environment is greatly influenced by factors, such as nutrition and stress, both of which play a significant role in the broiler breeder industry, due to feed restriction practices, ranging from 25-80% of the ad libitum intake. The effects of nutrition and stress on the maternal environment have been extensively investigated in mammalian literature, primarily focusing on the development and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) in offspring, including exposure to the stress hormone cortisol. Disruption of the HPA axis can inadvertently disrupt other important endocrine pathways, involved in growth and metabolism, including the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor I axis (GH/IGF-I) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT). Any disruption or ‘reprogramming’ of the metabolic endocrine axes through maternal influences has been linked to variations in progeny performance, including growth rate and body composition. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for these phenotypic differences remain unclear, especially in poultry.

Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat stress in chickens in the humid tropics

K.A. LARTEY, D.-J. KANG, Q.-H. ZHANG, C.-Q. SHI, F. YANG, H.-Y. LIN, R. GOONERATNE and J.-J. CHEN

Chromolaena odorata contains polyphenols and antioxidant enzymes that activate biology defence mechanisms and stress-sensing transcription factors to prevent oxidative damage and heat stress in chicken. Dietary inclusions of C. odorata leaf meal at 12%, and C. odorata crude flavonoids at 400 mg/kg/d exerted competitive exclusion to enhance gut eubiosis, humoral immunity, hypoglycaemia and metabolic functions, necessary to attenuate oxidative stress in chickens. Ethanol extract of the herbal plant at 25 – 400 µg/mL showed a strong antioxidant capacity in vitro, similar to 10- 80 µg/mL standard ascorbic acid. Chromomoric acid C- 1 from C. odorata methanol extract, at 10 µg also demonstrated anti-inflammatory potential by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NF-κB in a luciferase reporter assay at inhibition capacity (IC50) of 6.9 µM. These biological defence properties of the obnoxious weed have potential to maintain gut microbial homeostasis and gut integrity, enhance antioxidative physiologies for cellular oxidative balance, and mitigate oxidative damage required to alleviate heat stress. The invading nature of the plant in the humid tropics makes it a readily available and cheap bioresource. Hepatotoxic, mutagenic and cytotoxic evaluations suggest the aerial parts of the herbal plant is a safe bioresource for animal nutrition and sub-therapeutical uses.

Use of alfalfa meal in layer diets – a review

A.Ö. YILDIZ, E.T. ŞENTÜRK and O. OLGUN

Alfalfa meal is used in poultry diets because of its content of pigments and secondary metabolites. On average, alfalfa meal contains 17-20% crude protein, 1650 kcal/kg metabolisable energy, 20-25% crude cellulose, 1.50% calcium, 0.25% total phosphorus, 0.70% lysine, and 0.25% methionine, depending on the quality of the alfalfa meal. Alfalfa meal with a high content of beta carotene and xanthophyll is used to supplement poultry diets in order to obtain good yolk and skin pigmentation. In addition to producing good pigmentation, it is low in cholesterol because of the high cellulose content and anti-nutritional factors.

Although alfalfa meal is high in protein with moderate quality, its use is restricted because of the high cellulose content. The use of alfalfa meal in layer bird diets can reduce feed intake and egg production. On the other hand, it is very effective in reducing the cholesterol content of eggs and increasing the colour score of the yolk. The current recommendation is to restrict the use of alfalfa meal to 10% of the diet, although further research is needed on the use of additives to alfalfa-meal containing diets.

Characteristics of the Kashmir Anz geese breed

H. HAMADANI, A.A. KHAN and M.T. BANDAY

The local domestic geese breed of Kashmir Valley has now been registered as a recognized breed named ‘Kashmir Anz’, making it the first and the only recognized domestic geese breed in India as of now. Geese rearing in the Valley dates back to ancient times. They are reared for meat, eggs, and as a hobby in areas located around the water bodies. Kashmir Anz are cinnamon, white, and a mixture of cinnamon and white coloured geese with beak colour varying from black to yellow through all intermediates. Shanks are orange, and eyes are either grey or brown. Peculiarities like knob, dewlap and paunch is also present in some of these geese. Two Strains (or within breed types) of ‘Kashmir Anz’ breed include ‘Safed Anz’ and ‘Katchur Anz’. Sexual dimorphism on the basis of plumage and eye colour is absent. Vent sexing or vocalization method are the most accurate and practical methods of gender identification respectively. Adult body weight of the gander is 3.82 kg and that of the goose is 3.34 kg. The average body temperature, respiration rate and heart-rate is 40.05±0.15°C, 17.16±0.75 breaths min−1 and 60.57±5.09 beats min−1, respectively. The goose lays about 12 white-shelled eggs in a year, each weighing about 137 g on an average. Dressing percentage of a Kashmir Anz geese is 67.7%. The acceptability of its meat is good and significant proportion of consumers have rated it better than chicken meat as well as mutton in terms of appearance, texture, taste and overall acceptability.

Genetic selection of broilers and welfare consequences: a review

K.M. HARTCHER and H.K. LUM

The genetic selection of broilers over the past 60 years has focused narrowly and intensely on production traits, namely growth rate and feed efficiency. This has led to significant welfare problems in birds grown for meat, including leg disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and resulting high mortality rates, while the breeder birds are subjected to severe feed restriction. Bone problems such as bacterial chondronecrosis and tibia dyschondroplasia are prevalent, and recent studies have reported the prevalence of birds with moderate to severe gait impairment to be between 5.5 and 48.8%. Worldwide, over 66 billion broilers are slaughtered annually. This huge scale of meat chicken production means that welfare problems are widespread and are likely to increase in severity due to the increasing global human population, increasing demand for meat, and a continued focus on efficiency of production in the agricultural sector. The commercial broiler industry therefore represents some of the most serious animal welfare issues in agriculture. There is an urgent need to address these problems by making welfare traits high priorities in breeding programmes and integrating these with other breeding goals. Many studies recommend the use of slower-growing breeds that do not have the same welfare problems. Addressing these welfare issues is essential to improve bird welfare and for social acceptability and sustainability of the broiler industry worldwide.

 

Branch News

France

World's Poultry Congress 2020

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

The French branch is in the process of finalizing the World's Poultry Congress (WPC2020), that will take place at the Palais de Congrès in Paris on August, 16-20, 2020. The objective of the Congress is: ‘Integrating knowledge for sustainable and diversified poultry productions’. On days 1 and 4, plenary lectures will address global challenges. On day 2 and 3, parallel sessions will feature at least four multidisciplinary ‘object oriented’ sessions in the morning and up to seven specialised sessions in the afternoon. Several early sponsors are already supporting the event and further applications are welcome.

Abstract submission closed on January 5th, 2020 with the reception of 1400 abstracts, currently under evaluation. The organising committee received nearly 1000 early bird registrations by December 31st, 2019. Regular registrations will continue at the regular price through March 31st, 2020, and at la higher price after. See https://www.wpcparis2020.com for detailed information about registration and the programme for WPC2020.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, and Michel Duclos, secretary WPSA FranceChristophe Bostvironnois, President, WPSA France 

Germany

The German Branch proudly presents the speakers for the Spring Conference of the German Branch, which will be held at the University of Rostock on March 10-11, 2020. Registration is open until March 1st, 2020, and can be made by replying to foerster [AT] ltz [DOT] de).

The programme will include:
Michael Oste et al., Dummerstorf: P-FOWL: Effects of differential phosphorus supply for poultry.
Gürbüz Daş et al., Dummerstorf: Does a dual purpose genotype differ from meat and layer type genotypes in terms of response to experimental nematode infections?
Vivian Goerlich-Jansson, Utrecht: The importance of the prenatal and early postnatal environment for the behavioural and physiological development of chickens.
Uwe Rösler, Berlin: ESBL and AmpC colonization of broilers - influence of hygiene and management.
Volker Siemers, Visbek: Exhaust air treatment in poultry farming - procedure, services, costs.
Susanne Rothstein, Göttingen: Larval meal produced from the black soldier fly as a potential protein supplier for broilers.

The German Branch will also host the 12th European Symposium on Poultry Genetics in Hannover, October 26th to 28th, 2021! More information to follow….

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, Germany Branch

Italy

The Italian Branch of WPSA is organizing the 56th edition of its annual meeting that will be held on April 24th, 2020 at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy), and it will deal with the topic: ‘Are We Pushing Broilers to Their Biological Limits?’ This emerging topic will be explored thanks to the contributions of a number of prestigious international speakers.

PROGRAMME

09:45   Opening Address, Martino Cassandro, President of Italian Branch of World’s Poultry Science Association
10:00  Applying Energy Balance Modelling to Assess the Limit of Efficiency of Broiler Chickens, Ilkka Leinonen, Natural Resources Institute (Finland)
10:30   Is gut functionality a limitation for maximizing growth, Birger Svihus, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway)
11:00  Rapid Growth and Leg Weakness in Broilers, Bob Wideman, Jr., University of Arkansas (USA)
11:30  Fast Muscle Growth in Meat Quality Issues, Massimiliano Petracci, University of Bologna (Italy)
12:00   Consequences of the Breeding of Broilers for Rapid Growth and High Breast Meat Yield, and Their Genetic Mitigation, Avigdor Cahaner, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)
12:30  Discussion and Conclusions
13:30  Lunch Break
14:30  Meeting of WPSA Members


On the day b2021 espnefore the meeting, WG2 members will visit the ‘Rimini Conference Centre’ where the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) will be hosted from September 20th to 23rd, 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA
<info [AT] wpsa [DOT] it>

Japan

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS), the official scientific journal published by the Japan Poultry Science Association (JPSA), became a member of PubMed Central (PMC), and the articles of the journal can be accessed through the PubMed search engine. We welcome the contribution of original research articles and reviews to the JPS using the following web site: https://jpn-psa.jp/en/jps-en/.

The 2020 Spring Meeting of JPSA will be held at Kyoto University in Kyoto during 27–28 March where presentations of original research findings, a symposium, a general meeting and a council meeting will be organised. The council meeting will be held on March 27, and the presentations of research findings as well as the general meeting will be organised on March 28.

The presentations of original research findings will include 48 titles, 17 titles of which will be candidates for the Presentation Award of young researchers. The theme of the symposium is: ‘The needs of a Ph.D. status in the industries’. It will be a joint symposium with the Japan Animal Science Association. For The detailed information please see the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/oshirase/?lang=en).

The best paper award for young researchers will be announced, 2019 of the JPS will be announced during the general meeting. The General meeting members will also involve the election of new board members and the Secretary for the JPSA, including Japan’s councillor members for the World Poultry Science Association (WPSA) assembly in Paris. The officers will be elected to serve for the next two years.

The JPS (the official journal of JPSA, IF: 0.670) always welcomes the submission of reviews and original papers. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the published articles.

JPSA wants to contribute to poultry science, not only in Japan, but all over the globe by enhancing its international activities with JPSA members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges to publish such member’s papers in the JPS are set the regular membership price. JPSA invariably welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit our JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

New Zealand

The 2020 New Zealand Poultry Industry Conference will be held on 6-7 October 2020, in Nelson, New Zealand

IReza Abdollahi, Secretary, New Zealand Branch

Russia

Scientific communication with industry: The VNITIP Federal Scientific Centre of the Russian Science Academy in Serguiev Posad, Moscow Region, recognises the importance of scientific communication with the industry and has a programme to encourage this effort. Every year more than 1000 experts from Russia and abroad attend lectures from leading scientists in poultry industry areas, exchange experiences and discuss innovations from local and foreign poultry science efforts in Ptitsegrad. All are welcome to attend the courses in Serguiev Posad.

Tatiana Vasilieva, Secretary

 

Spain

The Spanish branch of WPSA organises the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit that will be held from March 25-27, 2020 in the city of Córdoba. More than 250 attendees are expected at this meeting from more than 30 countries. Scientists will present about 100 scientific communications covering many topics of poultry science, especially on topics important for the Mediterranean area.
In addition, 15 guest speakers will provide keynote presentations during the sessions. Several workshops will also be held. Speakers such as Michael Czarick, who will chair a workshop on ventilation or Wim Tondeur, who will chair a workshop on slaughtering problems, will be among the guest stars for the event. All information on the Mediterranean Poultry Summit is available at: www.mpn-wpsa.org

Carlos Garcés Narro, Secretary, Spain Branch

Turkey

The General Assembly of the WPSA Turkish Branch, which is held every three years, met on 21 January 2020. After the approval of the activity report, elections were held for new board members. The following members were elected:

President: Prof. Dr Rüveyde Akbay
Vice-President: Dr Kemal Akman
Secretary: Prof. Dr Kâzım Şahin
Treasurer: Assoc. Prof. Dr Cengizhan Mızrak
Board Member: Mr. Gülbenk Yalçın
Board Member: Mr. Yüce Canoler
Board Member: Prof. Dr Sezen Özkan

In the first board meeting held after the General Assembly, it was decided to organise a symposium with the title ‘Hormones, Antibiotics and GDO in Poultry Meat.’ That symposium will be held on 19 March in Ankara to inform the general public about the status of these factors, and to dispel misconceptions regarding the occurrence of these items in poultry products.
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Prof. Dr Sezen Özkan, Secretary, WPSA Turkish Branch

United Kingdom

New Opportunity: The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award

The UK branch is pleased to announce a new Academic Career Advancement Award in memory of Professor Gordon D Rosen. Gordon contributed a highly logical and very descriptive approach to animal nutrition from the 1960s through to just a few years before his death in 2015. A full obituary for him is available in volume 71 of World’s Poultry Science Journal. He was an inspirational person whose curiosity and gently framed yet penetrating questions made him a legend. There is a generation of scientists influenced by his presence – always in the front row – of scientific meetings, and now his wife Vanda would like to encourage other scientists to develop their own inquisitiveness through this new award.

The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award provides £2000 each year to fund an academic adventure. With this aim, the award is open in nature, while particularly encouraging people to become multidisciplinary in their approach to research. The award is open to UK branch members who are within their early career spanning from 2 years to 5 years post PhD viva. Examples of proposals might include a request to attend an academic conference (particularly one outside your core field), support for an educational tour of another country or global region, support to visit another institution to learn a new technique or approach, or support to publish a major research output in a journal requiring publication fees.

Proposal forms and conditions of the GD Rosen Award can be found on the WPSA-UK website.
The DEADLINE for this years APPLICATIONS was 30th January 2020.

Dr Emily Burton, UK Branch Secretary

USA

The coalition of North American branches of WPSA (USA, Canada and Mexico) is excited to announce that the coalition is in the process of developing a bid to host the XXVII World’s Poultry Congress in 2024. We have selected Toronto, Canada, as our proposed site for this event and look forward to sharing more bid information with our WPSA colleagues over the next few months leading up to the World’s Poultry Congress this summer in Paris.

Bob Buresh, WPSA Senior Vice President, and Secretary USA Branch

 

March 2018 Newsletter

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
Volume 42, March 2018  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein, ghavenst [AT] ncsu [DOT] edu 

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

Board meeting 2018
The annual board meeting is planned 16-17 September 2018 in Dubrovnik, Croatia, prior to the European Poultry Conference.

WPSA programmes
WPSA has several programmes to support members and branches. Details on the Travel Grant Programmes, the Speakers’ Bureau Programme and Proposals for Branch Development can be found on the WPSA website (under Support). Criteria for eligibility are published together with the (different) deadlines for the individual programmes. Please follow the instructions as inaccurate, incomplete and late applications will be rejected.

wpsa spandoek 2018 75 LR.inddWPSA presence at conferences and exhibitions
WPSA was present at the International Production and Processing Expo in Atlanta, USA and VIV MEA, Abu Dhabi, UAE. In both cases many visitors came to the booth, where promotional materials of WPSA, the WPS Journal and WPC 2020 were displayed. More and more the booth becomes a meeting place for members from several countries.
In the coming months WPSA will be represented at AGRA ME, Dubai, UAE, Victam, Asia, Bangkok, Thailand, and VIV Europe, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
There are a series of upcoming international conferences, for example the Asian Pacific Poultry Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, the Mediterranean Poultry Summit, Torino, Italy, and the European Poultry Conference, Dubrovnik, Croatia to which members are invited to attend the event and to meet many WPSA members and representatives. Details on these and other meetings can be found in the calendar on www.wpsa.com

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH)
The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization organises training courses on poultry (for 3 à 4 weeks) in several countries. More details are on www.wvepah.org. All activities will also be announced on our website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine

The last 6 weeks have been busy travel weeks, including two major trips for WPSA. In February I attended the International Production and Processing Expo (IPPE) in Atlanta, USA. I was joined in the WPSA booth by Drs. Mulder, Buresh, Akbay, and Uni. As usual, IPPE had huge crowds, with visitors coming from around the world. I was delighted that my government recognised the importance of our poultry industries, by sending our Secretary of Agriculture, Dr Sonny Purdue. It was good to have many WPSA members stop by our booth and visit. It was exciting to have new faces - folks who introduced themselves and asked about joining our Association. And as your Treasurer, I was most happy to see those members and Branch Secretaries who came by to pay me their dues!

This week I have been in the Napa Valley of California for the Pacific Egg and Poultry Association (PePa) Meetings. As always, the Student Programme of PePa was sponsored by the United States Branch of WPSA. Historically, poultry students from California, Oregon, Utah, and Washington attend this event. This year, two WPSA Travel Grant recipients from our Mexico Branch, joined the student mix. Our Senior VP, Dr Buresh, was on hand to judge the Student Poster Competition and assist me (PePa Student Programme Chair) at the Awards Ceremony.

2018 PePa mexican studentsThe WPSA-sponsored students from the University of Guadalajara: Jocelyn Barba and Maria Trujillo, were great representatives of their University and their home WPSA Branch. Both students presented posters, participated in the full convention programme, the student activities, networked with poultry scientists and producers, and even tasted a little of the famous Napa Valley wine!

I am delighted to see more students applying from our Latin Branches. Both Jocelyn and Maria have been charged with promoting the programme to classmates and assisting them with future travel grant applications. Being around these students for the entire convention and seeing how they took advantage of every educational opportunity, I can say that WPSA funds were well spent.

Quote from Jocelyn Barba Rodriguez, Mexico

During my stay in California attending the PEPA convention, I had the opportunity to meet many interesting people with a lot of experience in the poultry industry thanks to Dr Bradley. The lectures were really interesting in which they clarified me what was the role of Mexico in the world industry, I especially enjoyed the conference of Jim Summer, President of the United States Export Council for Birds and Eggs. With its motto ‘Poultry and eggs from the United States feed the world’. I think Mexico has the potential to overcome the parameters that have taxes today. The other conferences were topics on which we may not yet worry in Mexico because we have different objectives. On the second day of the conferences I was interviewed by Mr John Bedell from J. S. West Milling Co. and I got an experience about job interviews, I also had the opportunity to meet and discuss the work of Mr Dave Crockett; I had the honour of making two good friends, Miss Alejandra Figueroa and Myrna Cadena of Davis University, who gave me a little tour of their workplace and their medicine unit. In summary, the experience was enriching in many ways, I met many people with an impressive trip, I have been very fortunate, I would like to thank them for making it possible for me to have the opportunity to go so far.

Quote from Maria Trujillo

I want to thank you for the opportunity that WPSA provided to me. Having attended the PePa Convention has been a truly gratifying experience in my life.
The entire event was quite interesting, from the student poster presentations (my participation in these poster presentations goes without saying), the informational sessions, and the debate between the students over the poultry case reports. Every moment left me with new knowledge which adds to my experience as a future professional in the avian sciences.
In terms of the sessions, I want to mention that the presentation I found very inspirational was that of Marilyn Dolan and Hinda Mitchell titled ‘Social Media, don’t be a hater’, because social media is a good diffuser of information to initiate a campaign in Mexico about the importance of avian production. In this way, the population will value its labour as well as the food that is produced.
During the convention, I had the pleasure of meeting many poultry producers and avian scientists. The individuals I remember most and with whom I had the opportunity to interact were Dr Rocio Crespo, DVM from the Avian Health & Food Safety Lab, WA and Dr Rodrigo Gallardo, DVM, PhD, Associate Professor at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. I was also able to interact closely with Dave Crockett and his wife, Julie Crockett, business partners of NuCal Foods, an important company for the poultry industry. I had the opportunity to network with students from different universities and I am pleased to say that I made good relationships with some of them, for example, Alejandra Figueroa and Myrna Cadena from the University of California, Davis, as well as Rodrigo López and Cirenio Hisasaga from California State University, Fresno.
Of course, I cannot fail to mention that the experience touring through Napa and the nearby towns was wonderful. Visiting the places that our new friends from UC Davis took us throughout the university and the city of Davis was equally amazing. I returned to Mexico with a piece of California in my heart.
Once again, I greatly appreciate this opportunity.

Dr Francine Bradley


Reminder about Travel Grant and Speaker’s Bureau Application Submissions

Passport WPSA crop LRThe WPSA Board fully supports the awarding of Travel Grants (both for young WPSA members/students and older members) as well as the assistance for branches utilising the WPSA Speaker’s Bureau programme. Each of these programmes was developed with the intent to provide financial assistance to support members and branches demonstrating legitimate needs in these areas. All submitted applications are sent to the General Secretary of the WPSA for initial review and consideration. Those meeting ALL necessary application requirements are then forwarded to the WPSA Executive Committee for the next step in the application approval process.
To ensure your application receives timely consideration, it is imperative that ALL application conditions stated on the WPSA web site are fully adhered to. Travel grant applications must be submitted at least 3 months prior to the date of the meeting to be attended. As stated in the application conditions, incomplete or late submissions will not be considered for funding. One common oversight with Travel Grant applications is incomplete budget request and justification information in accordance with the stated conditions. Another frequent error is the failure to adhere to page length requirements for supporting documentation. If the conditions state the requirement for a 2-3 page length Curriculum Vitae, submitting more than 3 pages becomes cumbersome to the approval process and this failure to adhere to the conditions can be considered as justification for application rejection. One final reminder is that all budgets and invoices must have costs converted to US dollars, and the total amounts must be presented.
In summary, the WPSA Board encourages all members and branches to utilise these programmes but asks that all members familiarise themselves with the application conditions. Submitting applications in compliance with these conditions will streamline the approval process and reduce the amount of extra work required for all parties involved.

Bob Buresh, Ph.D., WPSA Senior Vice President


Branch Development Programme

In the Board meeting held during WPC2016 in Beijing, China, the Board decided to increase the funds available for Branch Development by making a formal call for Branch Development Proposals. In 2018 we approved proposals from Croatia and Senegal.

For more information click here.

Next deadline for submission of Branch Development Proposals is July 1st.


epc2018 website 

 
  XV EUROPEAN POULTRY CONFERENCE  

   Dubrovnik, Croatia, 17-21 September 2018 


The WPSA- Croatian Branch is fully engaged in the organization of the EPC 2018 that will be held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, on September 17-21, 2018. The submission of abstracts for poster and oral presentations for EPC2018 is now OPEN!! The original abstract submission deadline was the 28th of February, but it has been extended to March 15, 2018. You are warmly invited to submit an abstract of your recent research findings, and to play an active part in the scientific programme by presenting your work at EPC 2018. Join us and contribute to the scientific programme!

Authors and Speakers are required to have Ticket ID in order to register and apply for Abstract presentations. Ticket ID will be provided when conference registration fees are paid, so we encourage you to register for the EPC conference before submitting your Abstract.

The Conference will be held in Valamar Hotel & Resorts in Dubrovnik, Croatia, from 17th to 21st September 2018. The organisers are anticipating the attraction of more than 1,000 participants from all over the world, who are willing to improve their knowledge of poultry research and production.

We encourage you to register before the 30th of April, 2018, in order to take advantage of the early bird rates. Special registration fees apply for WPSA members and students.

More information can be found on the web site www.epc2018.com

Conference topics

  • Economics and Marketing
  • Nutrition
  • Breeding and Genetics
  • Egg Safety and Quality
  • Poultry Meat Quality and safety
  • Reproduction and Incubation
  • Poultry Health
  • Poultry Housing and management
  • Poultry Welfare
  • Turkeys
  • Education an Information
  • Physiology
  • Family Poultry Production
  • Antibiotic Resistance
  • Other

EPC2018 Programme at a glance

MONDAY, 17TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Welcome cocktail and Opening Ceremony

TUESDAY, 18TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Plenary sessions in the morning
Oral presentation and Workshops in the afternoon

WEDNESDAY 19TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Plenary sessions in the morning
Oral presentation and Workshops in the afternoon
Gala dinner

THURSDAY, 20TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Plenary sessions in the morning
Workshops in the afternoon
Closing ceremony

FRIDAY, 21ST SEPTEMBER 2018
Technical tour and Youth programme

Plenary Speakers and the titles of their Lectures

(Alphabetical order)

Barbut, Shai: New insights on breast myopathies
De Cesare, Alessandra: Metagenomic insights into the dynamics of microbial communities in poultry and poultry products : current challenges and future opportunities.
Humphrey, Tom: Campylobacter infection compromises broiler health, welfare and performance.
Norton, Tomas: Application of precision livestock farming technologies in the poultry sector.
Nys, Yves: How scientific innovation may improve egg production and quality on the development of non-food uses of eggs.
Ryhlil, Ivan: Microbiota, chicken gut health, and antibiotic reduction/resistance.
Savic, Vladimir: Viral infections of poultry – the globally challenging situation.
Siegert, Wolfgang: Non-essential amino acids – the forgotten nutrients.
Sossidou, Evangelia N.: Managing on-farm health and welfare risks to promote sustainability in poultry.
Steenfeldt, Sanna: Alternative protein sources for poultry nutrition.
Tixier-Boichard, Michelle: Are there limits to selection in poultry: theoretical, biological, ethical, environmental?
Yalcin, Servet: Preincubation and incubation conditions, hatching time and broiler growth.

WPSA’s Croatian Branch members are looking forward to welcoming you to Dubrovnik

Helga Medic, Secretary, Croatia Branch


European Federation

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and the end of 2018.
News from a number of European Federation's working groups is provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

Nutrition

The next European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN2019) will be organised by the Polish Branch, and will be held in Gdansk, Poland from 10-13 June 2019. We will look forward to seeing all of you there.

WG4 and 5

2019 eggmeat banner
The ‘XXIV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat’ will be conjointly held with the ‘XVIII European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products’ in Çeşme, İzmir, Turkey between 23 -26 June 2019. Visit http://www.eggmeat2019.com to keep you updated. Special reduced registration fees are available for WPSA members and students.


Asia Pacific Federation

In the last newsletter there was a list of six purposes that all our members, particularly branch committees should work towards. One of these is to develop and maintain branches that are active and engaged. Here’s an idea on how branch committees can do this: Each branch should appoint a “communications” officer. It doesn’t have to be the secretary’s role. It should be someone with energy who likes reporting on things that are happening, someone with a journalistic tendency, perhaps a student member. He /she should report on anything happening in their branch or in any sector of their poultry industry. This need not be through formal channels like this newsletter, but more informally. Local branch news and comment, news about people in the industry etc. could be posted on branch websites or Facebook pages if there is one. News on branch activities, events that are coming up or industry news could be publicised via our association’s website.

This would be a positive move, giving members more value from their membership. We all like to know what’s going on!

Coming up

appc2018
The 11th Asia Pacific Poultry Conference, 25-27 March 2018, Plaza Athénée Hotel, Bangkok. This is the premier poultry conference for the Asia Pacific region. The conference themes are Sustainability and Emerging Topics in Poultry Production. Earlybird Registration is open until the end of December. For details www.appc2018.com

Alan Gibbins, President Asian/Pacific Federation

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

The next Ratite Working Group meeting will take place in Oudtshoorn, South Africa on the 14th of March 2018, at 12:00 on the Oudtshoorn Research Farm.
Queries can be send to me or Zanell Brand at zanellb [AT] elsenburg [DOT] com
Members that are doing research on ratites are also urged to contact us.

Anel Engelbrecht


World's Poultry Science Journal

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • Sun Chao - The potentially beneficial effects of supplementation with hesperidin in poultry diets
  • Syed Ehthisham-ul-Haque - Current loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technologies for the detection of poultry pathogens
  • Werner Bessei - Impact of animal welfare on worldwide poultry production
  • Yves Nys - Adapting trace mineral nutrition of birds for optimising the environment and poultry product quality
  • Prashant Nighot - Pathophysiology of avian intestinal ion transport
  • Mahmoud Alagawany - Nutritional significance and health benefits of designer eggs
  • Sun Chao - Health benefits and potential applications of anthocyanins in poultry feed industry
  • Asghar Ali Kamboh - Phytochemistry and beneficial impacts of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) as a dietary supplement in poultry diets
  • Peter Surai - Glutathione peroxidases in poultry biology: Part 1. Classification and mechanisms of action
  • Peter Surai - Glutathione peroxidases in poultry biology: Part 2. Modulation of enzymatic activities
  • Usama Aftab - The use of NSP enzymes in poultry nutrition: myths and realities
  • Shu-Biao Wu - Roles of dietary fibre and particle size in broiler nutirtion
  • Yves Nys - Sequential and choice feeding in laying hens: adapting nutrient supply to requirements during the egg formation cycle

Summaries

Glutathione peroxidases in poultry biology: Part 1. Classification and mechanisms of action

P.F. SURAI, I.I. KOCHISH and V.I. FISININ

Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) was described as a selenoprotein in 1973 and, since then, a great body of information has been accumulated to validate its important role in the antioxidant defence network in all animals, including poultry. The GSH-Px family includes at least eight members, and four of them (GSH-Px1, GSH-Px2, GSH-Px3 and GSH-Px4) are shown to be selenoproteins in animals. They are characterised by species- and tissue-specificity in their expression and activity. An optimal Se status in tissues/body is key for maximum expression of GSH-Px and therefore, in avian research GSH-Px activity is widely used as a biomarker for determining Se status and requirements. On the other hand, GSH-Px is an inducible enzyme and its activity depends on the level of stress and can be used as an index of antioxidant defences. In poultry production two forms of Se-dependent GSH-Px (GSH-Px1 and GSH-Px4) have received most attention. The aim of this paper is to review GSH-Px properties and functions in relation to poultry biology with special emphasis to its role in chicken adaptation to various stress conditions. Recent advances in selenoprotein identification and characterisation in relation to poultry Se status, dietary sources of Se and stress conditions can shed light on the roles of GSH-Px in avian biology.

Sequential and choice feeding in laying hens: adapting nutrient supply to requirements during the egg formation cycle

A. MOLNÁR, C. HAMELIN, E. DELEZIE and Y. NYS

Conventional feeding systems for laying hens rely on a complete feed available ad libitum in mash, pelleted or crumble form. When complete feeds are used, intake is mainly controlled by the hens’ energy requirement and feed presentation, but the birds cannot adjust their consumption to other nutritional needs and thus over-consume to cover the calcium needed for egg shell formation. Sequential, loose-mix and choice feeding offer birds the opportunity to select different diets in the short term. These feeding strategies have been proposed as alternative feeding systems whose main objectives are to match nutrient supply to individual requirements during the daily changes induced by the temporal sequence of the egg formation. This review discusses some findings related to the use of whole cereals and of alternating low and high energy or protein diets, conditions which may improve feed utilisation efficiency. In addition, the adjustment of calcium and phosphorus levels during the day can have benefits in terms of egg production and quality. This review explores the physiological basis for sequential, loose-mix and choice feeding and evaluates the impact of these systems on egg production and quality.

Impact of animal welfare on worldwide poultry production

W. BESSEI

Animal welfare has become an important issue in poultry production. Concern about poultry welfare has mainly been expressed in industrialised countries. Since trade of poultry products is highly internationalised, welfare aspects have to be considered by all countries involved. This paper reviews the changes in the attitude to animal welfare in Western societies and the related development of regulations and standards, the impact of high welfare standards on production costs and on international trade of poultry products and finally, the influence of different stakeholders on poultry production and marketing. From the 1960s onwards, animal welfare activities have been focused on farm animals kept under ‘industrial’ conditions, such as caged laying hens. Consequently, the management conditions for laying hens in Europe have been regulated in detail by national laws and EU-Directives. Meanwhile, conventional cages have been banned in the EU and welfare activities are now directed towards other issues, such as beak-trimming and killing day-old chicks of layer lines. All measures which are considered to improve the welfare of animals increase cost of production. Hence, differences in national welfare regulations are expected to relocate poultry production to countries with low welfare standards. There is a tendency that important retailers and food chains use welfare as a marketing argument and establish high price premium labels. Standards which are established and controlled by stakeholders of the poultry market are independent of national welfare legislation. This will lead to harmonisation of welfare standards on an international level. Most welfare labels have been developed by retailers in cooperation with welfare-oriented NGOs. There is a new trend in Germany where retailers and farmers organisations develop welfare schemes and poultry producers are paid an extra allowance for welfare-friendly production. This system ensures that poultry farmers are reimbursed for the welfare-related costs.

Adapting trace mineral nutrition of birds for optimising the environment and poultry product quality

Y. NYS, P. SCHLEGEL, S. DUROSOY, C. JONDREVILLE and A. NARCY

In the past, trace minerals have been inadequately considered by poultry nutritionists, as demonstrated by the scarce availability of literature. The practice of using high safety margins between requirements and dietary concentrations and the relative low cost of these essential minerals are possible reasons for this. Environmental considerations and regulations limiting trace mineral supply and improvements in analytical methods to detect putative contaminants in mineral sources have led to a need to a re-examination of trace mineral requirements. In addition, new knowledge regarding trace mineral roles in bone metabolism, anti-oxidant status, homeostatic regulation, product quality, immunology and the development of novel trace mineral sources have favoured, for the past 15 years, interests in optimising trace mineral nutrition considering other parameters than solely the bird performance. This review analyses the role of essential trace minerals (mainly Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, I, Se) in broiler and laying hen nutrition. This work aims to highlight the evaluation of trace mineral requirement, the bioavailability of trace mineral sources, especially in regards with phytate antagonism, and the main functions of trace minerals in egg, eggshell and meat quality. The impact of trace minerals on the environment (toxicity to plants and microorganisms) is considered and nutritional means to reduce the risk of environmental contamination will be explored. Finally, the possibilities of poultry product’s enrichment in some trace minerals for the benefit of human health will be explored.

Glutathione peroxidases in poultry biology: Part 2. Modulation of enzymatic activities

P.F. SURAI, I.I. KOCHISH and V.I. FISININ

It is known that glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) belongs to the first and second levels of the antioxidant network and is involved in the regulation of many important cellular pathways including maintenance of the redox balance and signalling. In poultry the GSH-Px family includes four Se-dependent forms of the enzyme, however only GSH-Px1 and GSH-Px4 are well characterised and have received substantial attention as important enzymes participating in chicken adaptation to commercially-relevant stresses. The aim of this review is to analyse the current data on relationships between various stress conditions and the GSH-Px activity in poultry with special emphasis to selenium status and nutritional supplements. Indeed, the published literature indicates that there is a range of different nutritional (Se supplementation, antioxidants, plant extracts, probiotics, drugs, mycotoxins) and environmental (temperature stress, transportation, disease) factors modulating GSH-Px activity and/or expression in different tissues from poultry. These inducible enzymes are involved in adaptation to stress and Se supplementation in optimal concentrations whereby form is key for antioxidant system maintenance under stress conditions in commercial poultry production.

Health benefits and potential applications of anthocyanins in poultry feed industry

L. CHANGXING, M. CHENLING, M. ALAGAWANY, L. JIANHUA, D. DONGFANG, W. GAICHAO, Z. WENYIN, S.F. SYED, M.A. ARAIN, M. SAEED, F.U. HASSAN and S. CHAO

Anthocyanins are flavonoids widely spread in various plant species as a major phyto-pigment. In recent years, interest in using anthocyanins as a feed ingredient has increased markedly owing to their health and other benefits. Anthocyanins possess various pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anticancer, antidiabetic, neuroprotective, anti-obesity and antioxidant effects. Dietary consumption of anthocyanins has revealed benefits in animal performance. Little is known about health-promoting effects of anthocyanins in avian species, but anthocyanin-rich dried fruits have shown positive effects on certain pathological conditions and health promoting markers in human and other animals. This review aims to gather information regarding health benefits of anthocyanins and highlight therapeutic and potential health beneficial effects of anthocyanins for poultry. Additionally, it explores these biologically important flavonoids as alternative ingredients in poultry feed to replace synthetic nutrients and medicines. The available literature reports studies involving use of anthocyanins focused on human, mice and in vitro models. However, there is a need to explore mechanism of action at molecular level to understand potential beneficial effects of anthocyanins in avian species.

The potentially beneficial effects of supplementation with hesperidin in poultry diets

X. YATAO, M. SAEED, A.A. KAMBOH, M.A. ARAIN, F. AHMAD, I. SUHERYANI, M.E. ABD EL-HACK, M. ALAGAWANY, Q.A. SHAH and S. CHAO

Flavonoids are natural compounds derived from different types of vegetables, fruits, and medicinal herbal plants. Hesperidin, a flavanone (a class of flavonoids) glycoside is found abundantly in citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons tangerines and limes and is known to possess significant benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-stress, antioxidant, growth promoting, anticancer and immunological properties. Hesperidin enhances mucosal and humoral immunity by increasing intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers, lymphoid organs (thymus, spleen and bursa) indices, as well as improving anti-avian influenza and anti-Newcastle disease antibody titres in poultry. In addition, hesperidin is a strong chain-breaking antioxidant that provides potent cellular antioxidant defence against the damaging effects induced by peroxide hydrogen. As a natural antioxidant, hesperidin could help mitigate heat stress during summer by decreasing heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, and quenching reactive oxygen species generated by summer heat stress. The aim of this review was to elucidate the biological effects and health benefits of hesperidin as an alternative of synthetic immune boosters and growth promoters in poultry diets.

The use of NSP enzymes in poultry nutrition: myths and realities

U. AFTAB and M.R. BEDFORD

The use of non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzymes has increased in recent years with most of the growth coming from the market segment which uses non-viscous diets. A variety of product choices are available to the feed industry. These range from mono-component, single enzymes, to cocktails of more than one activity, to so-called ‘complex’ enzymes, displaying, in addition to the main activity, several non-targeted (i.e. quality controlled or assured) activities within one product. The relative abundance of the substrate or the number of substrates presented by a given diet may not be viewed as the sole criterion for the fitness of an enzyme solution. An argument can be made that NSP enzymes should not be considered as classical digestive enzymes and any response may not be regarded simply as a function of the extent of in vitro or in vivo substrate hydrolysis. The idea of having additional non-NSP or NSP activities to ‘strengthen’ a xylanase response, as well as the notion ‘complex diet needs a complex enzyme’ appear to lack sufficient scientific backing. Measures based on alternative responses e.g. gut morphology, nutrient or energy digestibility, gut-flora and its metabolites or fermentation profiles, are useful in developing a wider understanding of the phenomenon but require careful interpretation as the stand-alone criteria of usefulness of an NSP enzyme. Performance data is always the ultimate judge of the efficacy of a feed enzyme. This review addresses the practical question of selecting an NSP enzyme. The aim is to discuss the data supporting some of the common views held in the industry today, and how these views significantly influence the process of selecting an NSP enzyme for commercial in-feed application.

Current loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technologies for the detection of poultry pathogens

S. EHTISHAM-UL-HAQUE, M.A. ZAMAN, M. KIRAN, M.K. RAFIQUE, M.F. QAMAR and M. YOUNUS

Traditional diagnostic capabilities (serology and culture) are not enough to monitor the poultry infections efficiently. For effective control of poultry infections, a regular program incorporating simple and cost-effective molecular diagnostics is necessary. On this rationale, it is possible to present working molecular diagnostic technology that would work equally well in field as well as in the laboratory. Recently, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay has emerged as simple and inexpensive diagnostic tool for the molecular detection of various animal pathogens. To perform LAMP, no specialised instruments (e.g. thermal cycler) are required, permitting its use in developing countries. Various reliable LAMP assays have been reported for the detection of different poultry pathogens. However, still there is a need to improve the sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, user-friendliness, delivery to end-user and affordability of LAMP assays. This article reviews current LAMP assays available for the molecular detection of important viral, bacterial and protozoan pathogens of poultry. It focuses on the various aspects of LAMP for the diagnosis of important poultry pathogens based upon pathogen type, specimen, target genes, LAMP primer types, detection limits, fluorescent detectors and LAMP chemistry used. This paper provides updates on principle, instrumentation, basic methodology, quantification capability, reagents and kits used currently in performing LAMP.

Roles of dietary fibre and particle size in broiler nutrition

S.K. KHERAVII, N.K. MORGAN, R.A. SWICK, M. CHOCT and S.-B. WU

Increasing the structural components in the diet, namely through including coarse grain particles in diets and manipulating the dietary fibre composition, has been shown to improve gut health, feed utilisation and production efficiency. This is primarily because structural components physically stimulate activity in the fore gut. An example of this is dietary non-starch polysaccharides (NSP), namely insoluble NSP, which have been shown to instigate beneficial effects on gut health, litter quality and nutrient utilisation, by increasing crop and gizzard activity, stimulating digestive enzyme production and enhancing bacterial fermentation in the hind gut. However, there is a lack of consistency with regard to the direct effects of dietary fibre on chicken health and production. The aim of this review therefore is to explore the impact of feeding different sources of fibre and different size grain particles on gut health and microflora, nutrient utilisation, performance and litter quality in broilers.

Nutritional significance and health benefits of designer eggs

M. ALAGAWANY, M.R. FARAG, K. DHAMA and A. PATRA

Designer foods of animal origin are produced either by feeding specific diets, or using new techniques like genetic engineering, cross-breeding. Designer eggs are an important type of functional foods. With the advancement of poultry industry, there is a rising interest in poultry biotechnology for altering the egg composition by genetic and nutritional manipulations for human health. This can be done by modifying cholesterol concentration and its fractions, lipid profile, fatty acids, amino acids and minerals or through adding therapeutic pharmaceutical molecules. Designer eggs provide vegetarian, safe, immune powered, specialty or organic foodstuffs which can have improved vitamins, minerals, balanced ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids, lowered total cholesterol, additional boost of antibodies and essential pigments such as carotenoids. From the relevant scientific literature, functional eggs can be considered as human designer food. This review describes the concepts of designer eggs and their health benefits and nutritional values.

Phytochemistry and beneficial impacts of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) as a dietary supplement in poultry diets

M. SAEED, A.A. KAMBOH, S.F. SYED, D. BABAZADEH, I. SUHERYANI, Q.A. SHAH, M. UMAR, I. KAKAR, M. NAVEED, M.E. ABD EL-HACK, M. ALAGAWANY and S. CHAO

Cinnamon is a common spice obtained from the bark of Cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum zeylanicum). It has been used for culinary, as well as medicinal, purposes since ancient times in various countries. Apart from substantial amounts of several nutrients, including carbohydrates, proteins, choline, vitamins (A, K, C, B3), and minerals, several biological active compounds are present in the extract of oil, which contribute to immunomodulatory, antioxidant, antiviral, lowering blood cholesterol, antimicrobial, lipid-lowering, antihypertension, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, gastroprotective, antidiabetic, neuroprotective and blood purifying properties. Cinnamon roots serve as a hepatic stimulant by improving bile production, eliminating toxins, restoring electrolyte balance and regulating hydration and can be used for enhancing digestion. In addition, nutritional properties of cinnamon powder include positive effects regarding growth, digestion, enhanced activity of gut microflora, improvement of immune response, as well as improved feed efficiency and health improvement of poultry birds. Recently, research focus has been directed towards supplementing broiler diets with cinnamon powder as a phytobiotic in order to replace synthetic growth promoters. After reviewing the literature, it was found that the research at the molecular level to elucidate the mechanisms behind the potential of cinnamon as a feed additive in poultry is limited, despite its promising impacts. Furthermore, supplementation doses vary significantly, i.e., from 0.02 to 7%. So, the aim of this review was to compile the published research related to cinnamon, explore its beneficial properties, find out its optimal dosage for uses by veterinarians, researchers, and nutritionists, as well as its potential to use as a natural feed additive to replace the synthetic antibiotic growth promoters in poultry feed.

Pathophysiology of avian intestinal ion transport

M. NIGHOT and P. NIGHOT

The gut has great importance for the commercial success of poultry production. Numerous ion transporters, exchangers, and channels are present on both the apical and the basolateral membrane of intestinal epithelial cells, and their differential expression along the crypt-villus axis within the various intestinal segments ensures efficient intestinal absorption and effective barrier function. Recent studies have shown that intensive production systems, microbial exposure, and nutritional management significantly affect intestinal physiology and intestinal ion transport. Dysregulation of normal intestinal ion transport is manifested as diarrhoea, malabsorption, and intestinal inflammation resulting into poor production efficiency. This review discusses the basic mechanisms involved in avian intestinal ion transport and the impact of development during growth, nutritional and environmental alterations, and intestinal microbial infections on it. The effect of intestinal microbial infections on avian intestinal ion transport depends on factors such as host immunity, pathogen virulence, and the mucosal organisation of the particular intestinal segment.



Branch News

Argentina

12th International Seminar on Poultry Science – 10th Poultry & Swine Exposition

The Argentinean Branch of the World´s Poultry Science Association (WPSA) is collaborating in the organisation of the 12th International Seminar on Poultry Science. This scientific meeting, organised every two years, will be held during the 10th Poultry & Swine Exposition, in Buenos Aires City, Argentina, on May 8-10, 2018. This event is organised by egg and broiler producers associations, CAPIA & CEPA. In general, the participants for this event are Spanish speakers from Latin America. It expects to have more than 2,000 participants (producers, students and professionals), representing one of the most important events of the Argentinean poultry community. The Seminar will be given in Spanish, and English presentations will have simultaneous translation into Spanish by a Veterinarian specialist. The WPSA will provide two expert speakers, supported by the WPSA Speakers’ Bureau programme. For more information, visit www.avicola.com.ar

Austria

The Austrian branch of WPSA was revitalised during a general assembly of the branch members in December 2017, and a new board was elected. Prof. Dr Martin Gierus, from the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, was elected to serve as President; and Dr Peter Mitsch from Tierarzt GmbH, Vienna, was elected as vice president. The new board is motivated and welcomes both new and old members and is looking forward to bringing the different sectors of the poultry industry together for good discussions and developments!

Simone Schaumberger, Austria Branch Secretary

France

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

The French Branch of WPSA is delighted to invite you to participate in the upcoming World Poultry Congress that will be held from the 16-20 August 2020 in the attractive city of Paris. Information can be found on the web site http://www.wpcparis2020.com/

Please notice that the organisers propose an Early Sponsoring period for the 2020 World Poultry Congress. The Congress will be held in Paris and will attract more than 3000 attendees from all over the world: experts, scientists, researchers, production specialists will participate in presenting and discussing their most recent findings. The early sponsoring will allow our partners to have the benefit of longer visibility (three years before the event), larger opportunities in the sponsoring of activities, as well as eligibility for a 15% discount in 2018. If you are interested and want to know more about this opportunity, please contact us at wpsafrance [AT] wpsa [DOT] fr or N [DOT] Taleb [AT] clq-group [DOT] com

For more information: http://www.wpcparis2020.com/

The French branch of the WPSA organises its yearly day 'les jeudis de la WPSA' on the 22th of March 2018 in Nantes. This conference involves scientists and poultry experts and explores a particular area. The topic of the year is the Precision livestock farming, automated continuous recording using novel communication technology and Big data in Poultry production. More information is available at http://www.wpsa.fr/index.html

In March 2017, the French Poultry Science Meeting (JRA) took place in Tours. This event is hold every 2 years in France and brings together more than 500 Poultry experts. More information can be found at http://www.itavi.asso.fr/jra/2017. Video recording was carried out for some of the reviews (in French). They can be watched at http://www.wpsa.fr/presentation/JRA%202017%20.html

Yves Nys, President–WPSA France

Italy

2018 mpn banner

The next edition of the Mediterranean Poultry Summit is approaching (18-20 June, 2018) and prominent invited speakers from European and Middle East will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg productions, especially dealing with Mediterranean Area. Visit http://www.mpn-wpsa.org/main/ to check the topics of the different sessions and for registration. Of course, special reduced registration fees are available for WPSA members and students.

The Italian Branch of WPSA is also organising the 54th edition of its annual meeting that will be held on April 6th, 2018 in Perugia. This meeting will deal with ‘Farming strategies to reduce antibiotic usage in poultry production’ and this hot topic will be explored thanks to the contributions of a number of prestigious international speakers.

PROGRAMME

Opening address
Francesco Tei, Head of the Dept. of Agricultural Sciences, Food and Environment, University of Perugia
Martino Cassandro, President of Italian Branch of World’s Poultry Science Association

Current situation on the reduction of the antibiotic use in animal farming in Italy
Giuseppe Diegoli, Department of Health Policies, Prevention and Public Health Service of Emilia-Romagna Region

Environmental management of poultry farms
Jim Donald, National Poultry Technological Centre, Auburn University (USA)

An innovative system for monitoring poultry health and behaviour
Marian Dawkins, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford (UK)

Experience of a world’s leading poultry producer in the reduction of antibiotic usage
Roy Brister, Tyson Food (USA)

Viewpoint of a leading Italian retailers on the reduction of antibiotic usage
Chiara Faenza, Coop Italia

Contact:
Massimiliano Petracci
Dept. of Food and Agricultural Sciences – University of Bologna
Tel. +39 0547 338128, Fax: +39 0547 382348
Email: info [AT] wpsa [DOT] it 

Any additional information can be received at our site: www.wpsa.it

Massimiliano Petracci, Branch Secretary

Japan

The Spring Meeting of JPSA, 2018, will be held at the University of Tokyo, Tokyo during 29–30 March. The meeting will consist of original paper presentations, a seminar, and general as well as council meetings. The council meeting will be held on March 29, and the paper presentations as well as the general meeting will be organised on March 30.

The luncheon seminar will be held on March 30. Mr. Jiro Yokoyama of Nosan Corporation will give a talk on ‘Hikari brand iodine-enriched eggs, the story behind the development and the plan for the future’. Hikari brand iodine-enriched eggs are laid by hens raised on iodine-blended feed containing powdered seaweed. Hikari eggs were confirmed to have various beneficial health effects which were not found in iodine alone. The Hikari brand of iodine-enriched eggs is now one of the famous brands of value added eggs. Mr. Yokoyama will present an interesting background story for the Hikari brand of eggs.

JPSA will support two young scientists who will be attending the 11th Asian Pacific Poultry Conference (11th APPC) during 25-27 March, 2018 in Bangkok, Thailand. Mr. Takashi Ono, Graduate School of Hiroshima University, will present a paper entitled ‘QTL mapping for the content of free amino acids in chicken meat by restriction-site associated DNA sequencing’. Mr. Yuki Hakamata, Graduate School of Tohoku University, will present a paper entitled ‘Differences in mitochondrial fatty acid utilization and respiratory complex characteristics between meat-type and laying-type chickens’.

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS, the official journal of JPSA, Impact Factor: 0.771) always welcomes the submission of reviews and original papers. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to have an access to its published articles. JPSA wants to contribute to poultry science in Japan and all over the world by enhancing our international activities with members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges to publish their papers in the JPS will be set at a membership price. JPSA invariably welcome new members from all over the world. Please visit JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

Naoki Goto, Secretary Japan Branch

New Zealand

The 2018 New Zealand Poultry Industry Conference will be held from 2-3 October 2018 at the Quality Hotel Plymouth International, New Plymouth, New Zealand. The meeting will be organised by World’s Poultry Science Association-New Zealand Branch in Association with the Monogastric Research Centre, Massey University.

Pakistan

A New Face for the WPSA-Pakistan Branch

WPSA’s Pakistan Branch has put together a new administration for 2018.

The new members of the administrative group include:

  • Dr Muhammad Sadiq – President (CEO-SB Poultry Pakistan)
  • Dr Nasir Mukhtar – Vice President (Assistant Professor Department of Poultry Sciences PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi Pakistan)
  • Dr Khalid Mahmood Shouq – General Secretary (Editor Vet. News & Views)
  • Dr Muhammad Kashif Saleemi -Assistant Secretary / Treasurer (Assistant Professor Department of Vet. Poultry -University of Agriculture Faisalabad Pakistan)

The new administration has established Poultry Science Clubs in 16 Universities of Pakistan. This was done in collaboration with Pakistan’s WPSA Branch office. Our Branch members will be organising an International Conference on the eve of our World Egg Day.

 2018 march sadiq  2018 march mukhtar  2018 march shouq  2018 march saleemi
President
Dr Muhammad Sadiq
CEO
SB Poultry PVT LTD
48-C Satellite Town
Chandani Chowk, Muree Road
Rawalpindi
Pakistan
Phone: +92 51 111 505050
Fax: +92 51 4451191
mail [AT] sadiqbrothers [DOT] com 
Vice President
Dr Nasir Mukhtar
Assistant Professor
Department of Poultry Sciences
PMAS Arid Agriculture University
Murree Road 46300

Secretary
DR Khalid Mahmood Shouq
The Veterinary News & Views
392-A, Samanabad
38070 Faisalabad
Pakistan
Mobile: +92 300 6620616
khalidshouq [AT] gmail [DOT] com 
Phone: +92 41 2665352
Fax: +92 41 2562853 
Assistant Secretary/Treasurer 
Dr Muhammad Kashif Saleemi
Assistant Professor
Department of Vet. Pathology
University of Agriculture
Faisalabad
Pakistan
Mob: 92 (0)300-6644072
drkashif313 [AT] gmail [DOT] com 

Saudi Arabia

The Saudi branch meeting will be held on 22 March, 2018 at Qassim University.

Moataz Fathi, Secretary of the Saudi Arabia Branch

Turkey

The WPSA Turkish Branch is in a period of intense activity. We will organise the 'Niğde International Poultry Congress', situated in the unique geological wonderland of Cappadocia, between 9-12 May 2018 in cooperation with the Niğde University Faculty of Agriculture. Our members of the Organising and Scientific Committees are working at full speed for a very successful congress.

One of the most important meetings of the WPSA European Federation, the XXIV. European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat and XVIII. European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products will be hosted in the Aegean resort town of Çeşme (İzmir) from 23-26 June 2019.

Branch President Rüveyde Akbay attended the International Production & Processing Expo in Atlanta between 30 January – 1 February 2018, and she had the opportunity to meet with industry representatives and colleagues during this important event.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Cengizhan Mızrak, Secretary of the WPSA Turkish Branch

United Kingdom

The 2018 UK WPSA Annual Meeting will be held in Dublin from 9-11 April at Dublin’s iconic Croke Stadium with a theme of ‘Innovation to compete in the global livestock industry’. The joint WPSA / BSAS event will see more than 500 scientists, vets, policy makers and farmers from across the globe gather to hear about the challenges and opportunities facing the livestock sector, and the ways it can innovate to create more sustainable systems. An international line-up of world-leading speakers will discuss the ground-breaking technologies being made in livestock production, as well as the issues that need to be addressed to ensure potential gains in productivity are grasped. Speakers will also discuss how those developments are communicated with farmers and producers, and how the sector can encourage the adoption of new ways of working.
The programme includes an invited session on advances in management of laying hens, followed by a variety of original communications on nutrition, physiology and husbandry and the usually frenetic but absorbing short oral communications on selected poster presentations. This will be followed by the annual Gordon Memorial Lecture delivered by Mike Bedford and titled: ‘The evolution and application of enzymes in the animal feed industry: opportunities and misunderstandings’.
The meeting will finish with the Annual General Meeting of the UK Branch which will see the introduction of a new President, Vice president, Secretary and Treasurer.
We look forward to meeting up with Irish colleagues to explore how the poultry sector can share knowledge, ideas and best-practice as Brexit drives the UK to become more global in the way it deals with critical issues such as trade and policy. As ever, the UK branch annual meeting provides a great opportunity for helping scientists, policy makers and producers to build relationships and networks across the European livestock sector and beyond.
The papers presented at the 2017 Spring Meeting are now published in British Poultry Abstracts – all papers published are available on Open Access using the following links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17466202.2017.1394641 
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cbpa20/13/1 

Steve Lister, UK Branch Secretary

 

 

Volume 52, September 2020  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein, ghavenst [AT] ncsu [DOT] edu 

 

2020 wpc

2020 wpc

 

World's Poultry Congres 2021

8-12 August 2021, Paris, France

 

 

Registration for WPC2021

Registration for WPC2021 is open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

World’s Poultry Congress 2020 Paris, France, now in 2021

The new dates for the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress are 8-12 August 2021. More information on: wpcparis2021.com.

With regard to the scheduling of other WPSA symposia and conferences in the coming years, please avoid any overlapping with WPC2021. Please provide the new dates and other information for WPSA symposia and conferences to the WPSA office so it can be placed in the calendar on the website.

European Federation

The Mediterranean Poultry Summit in Cordoba Spain, is planned for 6-8 October 2021. WPSA Working Group symposia scheduled for 2021 will be postponed to 2022. The next European Poultry Conference in Valencia, Spain, 2022 will be postponed to 2023.

Asia Pacific Federation

The next World Waterfowl Conference will be held in Indonesia in 2021, the next APPC in November 2022 in China.

WPSA presence at exhibitions and conferences

Just before the lockdown of COVID-19, several Board members attended the IPPE in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Our booth was located in a very strategic place, so we were able to meet with many members and visitors.

Since, all exhibitions, most symposia and congresses planned for 2020 have been postponed or cancelled. As soon as the future situation allows, we will again begin attending exhibitions, symposia and conferences, in order to display promotional materials for WPSA, the World’s Poultry Science Journal, WPC 2021 in Paris, France, and for many other poultry related symposia and conferences. In the meantime in order to improve our communication with branches and members, the frequency of our newsletter has been increased to at least 6 times per year, and other news can also be seen on WPSA’s Facebook page.

World’s Poultry Science Journal

Starting in 2020, the World’s Poultry Science Journal is hosted and produced by Taylor and Francis Publishers. The transition from the previous publisher was well underway when the COVID-19 pandemic occurred. The pandemic has caused unprecedented disruption to our global distribution network. The good news is that the print and distribution of the journal has been resumed from 11th May. The March issue has been mailed, the June issue is underway and the necessary work for the September issue has been finalized. Of course, there still may be some delays because some countries are still operating with reduced or closed postal services, and international freight carriage is subject to delays and changes in routing at short notice.

The Editorial board of the Journal invites all members to submit reviews for the coming issues.

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH):

The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization that organizes 3-4 week training courses on poultry in several countries. More details are on www.wvepah.org. All activities will also be announced on our website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder, General Secretary

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

If you are reading this, I hope I can assume that you are in good health and continuing to protect yourself and family against COVID-19. Since the last Newsletter, our lives have continued in an atypical fashion. Your WPSA Executive Committee and Board members have been in frequent contact by phone, e-mail, and through the now-famous Zoom Meetings!

In addition to working with my colleagues on how to deal with and re-schedule all the WPSA events, postponed or cancelled during 2020, I have been carrying on with the regular work of the WPSA finances. I am very pleased to report that 90% of the companies who generously support the WPS Journal have paid their 2020 invoices for advertising and sponsorship. In addition, our hard-working Branch Secretaries have done a good job in dues collection and wiring the invoiced portion of international dues payment to me. I have been working with the Review of the Books Committee. They are in the middle of their task of going over the financial records of 2019. They will be submitting their report to Drs. Mulder and Yang. 

With the postponement of the World’s Poultry Congress until 2021, the 2020 WPSA Board Meeting that was scheduled for Paris will be conducted by - you guessed it - Zoom. I certainly will miss interacting in person with my colleagues, as well as greeting all of you in the City of Light.

As I write this, California is in the midst of a terrible heat wave and there are multiple wildfires raging throughout the state. I send wishes to you for more pleasant weather and freedom from natural disasters in your home areas.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer

26th World's Poultry Congress

Palais de Congrès, August 8-12, 2021, Paris, France20WPC blocmarque blocdates

ONE YEAR TO GO UNTIL WE FINALLY MEET IN PARIS

The organising committee was expecting to welcome WPSA members from all around the world in Paris during August 2020, for the 26th WPC. The Covid-19 crisis resulted in its postponement. We are now counting on everybody to join us for a successful WPC2021 in Paris, on 8 to 12 August 2021. https://wpcparis2021.com/

All authors who submitted abstracts in 2019 have now received their reviews and comments since April 2020. They are now permitted to modify their accepted abstracts or amend them with new results. Amendments must be completed before 31 August 2020.

The submission site will reopen for new abstracts from 1 September to 31 December 2020. Do not miss this chance to present your latest work.

Registrations previously made for cancelled WPC2020 are valid for WPC2021. The same regular fee will be used for any new registrations made through 31 December 2020.

Holding the World Poultry Congress in 2021 gives the WPSA Organization the opportunity to celebrate its 100th anniversary, since the first WPC was held during 1921.

wpc2021 100Let's celebrate!

Christophe Bostvironnois, President French Branch
Michael Duclos, Secretary, French Branch
Michèle Tixier Boichard, WPC2020, Programme Coordinator

Newly Compiled List of Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at wpsa [AT] xs4all [DOT] nl

 

European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2022. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espn

In order to avoid overlapping with the WPC that has been changed to August 8 - 12, 2021, the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) has been moved from 2021 to take place at the same planned venue, Palacongressi in Rimini, from 5 to 8 September, 2022. Our Branch would like to thank VET International and Palacongressi of Rimini for their cooperation and understanding during this time. Despite this difficult situation, we also much appreciate sponsors and partners who are confirming their support for our event. Of course, we will work hard during the coming months to ensure the postponed edition of the 23rd ESPN is a success. The city of Rimini is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and will help forge the future of poultry meat science. Additional details are available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/

WG3

Breeding and Genetics

The 12th symposium on Breeding and Genetics is being planned. It will take place in Hannover, 8-10 November 2022, and will be hosted by the German Branch. We would be pleased if you save this date and plan your participation. Further information will follow in due course.

Steffen Weigend, Chairman of the European Federations Working Group 3

WG4

Quality of Eggs and Egg Products

Due to the postponement of the World’s Poultry Congress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the WG4 meeting has been re-scheduled to take place during WPC2021 in August 2021, in Paris. Members who want to suggest topics to be discussed are more than welcome and can send their suggestions to the Chairpersons (cristina [DOT] alamprese [AT] unimi [DOT] it; joel [DOT] gautron [AT] inrae [DOT] fr).

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQ

As for all European Symposia, the next 'XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat' will be conjointly held with the 'XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products' have been postponed to June 8 to 10, 2022 thanks to our cooperation with the Polish Branch. The venue will be in Kraków, Poland, and the website is already available. The next WG5 member meeting will be held during World's Poultry Congress 2021 in Paris, see the Congress Programme for the meeting time and location.

Please visit http://www.eggmeat2022.com/ to keep yourself updated. Special reduced registration fees will be available for WPSA members and students. We will look forward to seeing many of you there. Prominent invited speakers from American and European Institutions will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production.

Most WG5 members will also be participating in the 2021 World's Poultry Congress in Paris, France on August 8-12, and the scientific programme of the two parallel sessions dealing with 'Meat Quality' will be defined under the supervision of the WG5 group in connection with the Congress Scientific Committee of which the WG5 chairperson is a part.

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary Italian Branch of WPSA

WG6

Incubation and Fertility Research Group (IFRG)

Due to the spread of the Covid-19 virus, which has created lots of uncertainty for traveling, WG6 (IFRG) has postponed its 2020 meeting and has rescheduled it for October 14-15, 2021 at the Holiday Inn in Leiden, The Netherlands. For more information see the website.

Ampai Nangsuay, Secretary WG6

WG10

Turkeys

The 11th 'Hafez' International Symposium on Turkey Production will be held in Berlin, Germany; May/June 2021. I hope to see you in Berlin.

Prof. Dr. Dr. H. M. Hafez, Institute of Poultry Diseases, Free University Berlin, Chair WG10


Asia Pacific Federation

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG1

Small Scale Family Poultry Farming

As well as the global impact on human health, Covid-19 unfortunately has serious secondary effects on the poorest communities in less well-developed economies. Since 1998, global poverty has been trending downwards but forecasts from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund suggest that Covid-19 will push a further 49 million people into extreme poverty in 2020. This would increase the total number of people in poverty who often must survive on less than US $1.90 per day to around 665 million. Food supply and demand, production and distribution of food, all on top of restrictions due to the virus, will be heavily impacted.

We know that family poultry farming can contribute to a reduction of poverty and a general improvement in the social condition of the poor. Extra effort to promote this is now needed more than ever. Planned for the World Poultry Congress in Paris this year was a WG session on Small Scale Family Poultry Farming. This WG session will be carried over to the postponed dates of 8 - 12 August WPC2021 in Paris, France.

Alan M. Gibbins, Chairman A/P WG1

A/P WG2

Waterfowl

The 6th World Waterfowl Conference was held in Taipei, Taiwan, during October 2017, and a board meeting was organized during that conference in order to appoint a new Chairperson for the Waterfowl WG, and to choose the host country for the next Waterfowl conference. By vote of the WG members, I was elected to serve as the new Chairman, and Indonesia was asked to serve as the host country for the 7th WWC. I would like to express my appreciation to the Taiwan Organizing Committee and the Taiwan branch for hosting an excellent and well-organized event in 2017.

Originally, the 7th WWC was scheduled to be held during September 2021 in Tangerang near Jakarta, but because the 26th WPC in Paris has been postponed to August 2021 we decided to delay the 7th WWC to 2022. The dates are not yet determined. We thought that many participants at the 2021WPC in Paris would also have been interested in participating in the 7th WWC, but it would have been difficult for people to attend both conferences in one year, if the original date had been maintained.

The 7th WWC will consist of three different programmes : i) scientific programme, ii) business forum, and iii) a culinary programme. We expect to stimulate interactions between scientists and corporations, both domestic and international, during the conference. We sincerely hope that the 7th WWC will be as attractive and as enjoyable as the 2017 conference in Taipei, and I look forward to welcoming many of you to the event in 2022.

Hardi Prasetyo, WPSA Indonesia, Chairman

A/P WG3

Ratites

The Ratite Working Group held a general meeting on the 18th of March 2020 at 10:00 on the Oudtshoorn Research Farm, Oudtshoorn, South Africa. The next meeting has been re-scheduled, and will take place during the 2021 World Poultry Congress that will be held in Paris, France on 8-12 August. Please let us know if you are planning to attend the meeting and Congress, as well as any topics that you would like to have considered, by sending an email to anele [AT] elsenburg [DOT] com

Anel Engelbrecht, Chair

 

7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

2021 7mpsDue to the current health situation and the uncertainty generated by the covid-19, the organizing Committees of the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit have decided to postpone again the event until October 6-8, 2021.

This difficult and sad decision is taken after a first postponement. At that time, we thought that the 6-month period contemplated for carrying out the MPS was enough time for the health situation to be controlled throughout the world. However, the world situation and the restrictions on capacity indoors suggest that a new postponement is the best option.

I hope the situation changes in one year and we can meet again face to face.

Thank you for your patience and support.

Warmest regards,

Carlos Garcés Narro

Details for the conference are shown on the website summit’s website: www.mpn-wpsa.org.

 

World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you have received an email from Taylor & Francis with instructions how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact support [AT] tandfonline [DOT] com”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • Ashley England -  The influence of light of different wavelengths on laying hen production and egg quality
  • Fazul Nabi -  Nutraceutical role of selenium nanoparticles in poultry nutrition: A review
  • Leonie Jacobs -  Stakeholder perceptions on broiler chicken welfare during first-day processing and the pre-slaughter phase: a case-study in Belgium
  • Mehmet Bozkurt -  The Effect of Feed Structure on Gastrointestinal Tract Traits and Performance in Laying Hens: An Overview of 70 Years’ Experience
  • Àndrew Wales -  Review of hatchery transmission of bacteria with focus on Salmonella, chick pathogens and antimicrobial resistance
  • Sonja Liu -  Reduced-crude protein diets in chicken-meat production: justification for an imperative
  • Ana Marquiza Quilicot -  Plant-derived products for the control of poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, 1778) – a review
  • Yumin Bao -  Amino acid nutrition and chicken gut health
  • Afaf Alnaser -  Poultry Industry in the Gulf Cooperation Council with Emphasis on Kuwait
  • Annemarie Mens -  Nutritional approaches to reduce or prevent feather pecking in laying hens: any potential to intervene during rearing?
  • Ebru Onbasilar -  Noninfectious Skeletal Disorders in Broilers
  • Kennady Vijavalakshmy -  Role of turmeric supplementation on stress management and production strategies in poultry nutrition
  • Rao Abbas -  Role of secondary metabolites of medicinal plants against Ascaridia galli
  • Anand Prakash -  Molecular basis of residual feed intake in broilers: A review

Summaries

The influence of light of different wavelengths on laying hen production and egg quality

ASHLEY ENGLAND and ISABELLE RUHNKE

Worldwide, commercial laying hens are frequently being used for only one production cycle mainly due to a decline in egg quality and/or egg quantity at 70-80 weeks of age. Extending the production cycle of these hens by improving or maintaining their egg quality and laying persistency could lead to both economic and environmental benefits as well as a more sustainable egg industry. Laying performance of the modern-day laying hen is highly dependent upon the light source used during housing and artificial lighting programs have been used for years to control egg production. Birds are able to perceive coloured light (400-700 nm) as well as the ultraviolet part of the spectrum (100-400 nm) due to the presence of an extra retinal cone in the eye. Studies have shown that red light, due to its longer wavelength of 660 nm, is able to stimulate the hypothalamus and elicit a photosexual response in all animals including birds. This can result in increased egg production in comparison to green, blue or white light exposure, although responses may be variable depending on bird strain and the intensity of the light used. Ultraviolet light has a shorter wavelength (100-400 nm) than visible light (400-700 nm) and so its effects on egg production are likely to be weak to non-existent. The benefits of UV light are mediated through its ability to activate cholecalciferol from 7-dehydroxycholesterol in the skin resulting in improvements in egg shell quality. These improvements in shell quality are most likely to occur in birds that are exposed to (natural) day light, as UV light can compensate to some extent the lack of Vitamin D in poultry diets. This review highlights the variable effects of light of different wavelengths and intensity on laying hen production, egg quality and its potential to extend the end of lay in commercial hens.

Nutraceutical role of selenium nanoparticles in poultry nutrition

F. NABI, M.A. ARAIN, F. HASSAN, M. UMAR, N. RAJPUT, M. ALAGAWANY, S.F. SYED, J. SOOMRO, F. SOOMRO and J. LIU

Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element with diverse physiological functions related to cellular homeostasis, body metabolism and antioxidant defence. Selenium is an integral constituent of at least 25 selenoproteins in the body that regulate cellular redox and antioxidant defence enzymes systems control free radicles of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dietary Se plays key role in immunity, growth and fertility in chickens, which require optimum levels in their diets to maintain high reproductive and productive performance of birds. In the last decade, dietary supplementation with selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) has enhanced the growth performance, feed conversion ratio (FCR), reproductive performance, egg production, immune response and antioxidant status, as well as improved the quality of meat and eggs and promoted microflora. Selenium has been shown to increase relative weights of immune related organs (burse and thymus) to enhance immunity. Feeding Se-NPs can improve antioxidant status and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in both broilers and layers. Use of Se-NPs at 0.9 mg/kg diet in broilers improved the intestinal health via increasing the population of beneficial bacteria and producing short chain fatty acids. This review focuses on the significance of selenium nanoparticles in poultry industry and provides insights about its comparative advantages over conventional sources of Se in poultry diets.

Stakeholder perceptions on broiler chicken welfare during day of hatch processing and the pre-slaughter phase: a case-study in Belgium

EVELIEN LAMBRECHT, LEONIE JACOBS, EVELYNE DELEZIE, HANS DE STEUR, XAVIER GELLYNCK and FRANK TUYTTENS

Day of hatch and pre-slaughter processing are stressful events (involving selection, handling and transport) for broiler chickens, putting pressure on welfare, which has economic consequences. This case-study documented common industry practices and evaluated poultry industry stakeholder perceptions related to broiler welfare during day-of-hatch processing and the pre-slaughter phase. Twenty-three individual in-depth interviews were conducted with representatives of key stakeholders in the Flemish poultry sector: hatchery personnel (5), farmers (6), poultry catchers (2), transporters (3), and slaughterhouse personnel (7). The findings showed various factors influencing broiler welfare during day of hatch processing and the pre-slaughter phase, with some discrepancies between stakeholder views and the scientific evidence. While stakeholders perceived the day of hatch processing procedures of chicks to be relatively under control, with no major issues, literature points out several issues, including first-week mortality and time without feed and water as major welfare problems. For broilers at slaughter age, the industry stakeholders’ views aligned well with scientific evidence on major welfare issues, such as injuries, thermal stress, mortality during fasting, catching, loading, transportation and lairage. This study provides novel insights in stakeholder perceptions, and potential avenues for future research and actions to reduce animal welfare problems in the poultry sector.

The effect of feed structure on gastrointestinal tract traits and performance in laying hens: An overview of 70 Years’ Experience

M. BOZKURT, I. GIANNENAS, M.ÇABUK and A.E.TÜZÜN

A large amount of existing evidence shows that the micro- and macrostructure of feed has a strong influence on the function, development and health of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), which, in turn, affects the performance of poultry birds. Notably, the majority of data corresponding to feed structure-induced changes in the productivity of birds has been generated from studies using broiler chickens. However, feed particle size and feed form remain an obscure and undervalued area of study in the feeding of layer chickens, with sparse evidence reported between the 1940s and 2000s. Moreover, feed in the form of crumbles and pellets, which has made a major contribution to broiler production efficiency, has not been the feed of choice for layers, where mash diets have been common practice worldwide for many years. Nonetheless, the role of feed structure in the feeding of layer chickens has recently begun to attract more interest. However, results are divergent and often not as satisfactory as expected, except in the case of gizzard weight, which typically decreases by 8% and 16% on average with finely ground and pelleted feed, respectively. The results for most performance parameters, however, are typically insignificant. In some cases where the effect of the feed form was significant, pelleting increased feed consumption by 6%, whereas a clear 9% reduction was observed in another example. The incongruities in the results are likely due to confounding factors, such as management conditions and ingredient composition of the diets. Nevertheless, the effect of feed form on the investigated parameters was more evident than the effect of feed particle size. The following review provides an overview of data from seven decades regarding the implications of feed structure on the physiology, histology, metabolism and development of the gut and the performance of egg-laying chickens.

Review of hatchery transmission of bacteria with focus on Salmonella, chick pathogens and antimicrobial resistance

ANDREW WALES and ROBERT DAVIES

Commercial poultry hatcheries potentially provide a sanitary barrier between breeder flocks and their progeny. This is important, particularly within the pyramid breeding structures in integrated poultry production systems. However, the operation of hatcheries and their focal position connected with multiple flocks, both on the input and output sides, means that they are vulnerable to being reservoirs of infectious agents. Of particular concern for hatcheries is the pseudo-vertical transmission of bacteria that are initially deposited at the surface of forming or freshly-laid eggs. These bacteria (of which Salmonella enterica is a prime example) can subsequently be present in the chick, as well as spreading within the hatchery environment to colonise other hatching birds. Furthermore, if such infectious organisms become persistent in parts of the hatchery environment, this allows their repeated transfer to hatching individuals or even (via personnel and fomites) to transfer back into breeding flocks supplying the hatchery. The use of antimicrobial drugs in hatcheries adds the further hazard of seeding progeny with antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) organisms. The mechanisms of hatchery, egg and subsequent chick contamination have been understood, and strategies to counteract the spread and persistence of infectious agents are well-established. However, many studies examining bacterial pathogens and AMR organisms in poultry production implicate hatcheries, either as a link in a chain or as a source of such agents. This review outlines the challenges posed by hatchery operation to control of bacterial transmission, it examines the contemporary and historical evidence for such phenomena, and it briefly discusses strategies to counteract the issue.

Justifying reduced-crude protein diets in chicken-meat production

S. GREENHALGH, P.V. CHRYSTAL, P.H. SELLE and S. Y. LIU

The justification for the chicken-meat industry to develop reduced-crude protein (CP) diets is compelling. Environment pollution by nitrogen and ammonia emissions can be improved, as a dietary reduction of 25 g/kg CP has been shown to generate a 25.8% reduction in N excretion. Bird welfare can be enhanced, as lower CP excretion improves litter quality and lessens incidence of foot-pad dermatitis and related conditions. Flock health can be improved by reductions in the flow of undigested protein into the hindgut which, in unchecked, fuels the proliferation of potential pathogens at a time when in-feed inclusions of antibiotics are in decline. Moreover, reduced-CP diets have the potential to lessen feed ingredient costs as prices of ‘synthetic’ amino acids are likely to decrease due to economies of scale in production. The successful development and adoption of reduced-crude protein (CP) diets may reduce the chicken-meat industry’s demand for sources of ‘intact’ protein, e.g. where soybean meal is dominant and in demand from many quarters. Using synthetic methionine, lysine and threonine in maize-soy diets been shown to lead to a substantial reduction in dietary CP from 356 to 200 g/kg, along with reductions in soybean meal from 709 to 293 g/kg feed. Reductions of 40% of soyabean use in feed have been postulated.

Plant-derived products for the control of poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, 1778) – a review

ANA MARQUIZA M. QUILICOT, ŽELJKO GOTTSTEIN, ESTELLA PRUKNER-RADOVČIĆ and DANIJELA HORVATEK TOMIĆ

The impact of Dermanyssus gallinae infestation on poultry health and production has driven the poultry industry to look for efficient control measures to be incorporated in integrated pest management (IPM). Attempts have been employed to control, if not, eliminate the infestation which includes application of chemicals, implementation of biological and/or physical measures, vaccination, or use of plant-derived products; or a combination of two or more of these measures. Chemical control, though efficient, has limitations such as the development of resistance in mite populations and safety issues concerning environmental residues and non-target organism toxicity. These limitations resulted in banning most of the previously applied synthetic acaricides; thus, attention has been directed to the potential of plant-derived products (PDPs). Among the PDPs reviewed, essential oils of bay, lime dis 5F, pimento berry, spearmint, cade, clove bud, penny royal, coriander, thyme, mustard, horseradish, sweet basil, peppermint and summer savoury results in up to 100% mortality by direct contact or fumigation. Whereas, garlic extract and essential oils of thyme, manuka, Eucalyptus citriodora and lavender produce mortality rates from 66-95.35% when applied directly or through spray. Three essential oils (penny royal, cinnamon bark and garlic) has ovicidal effect by direct contact. Other PDPs have the potential to reduce mite population and reproduction rates. This paper reviews PDPs on their efficacy, mode of action and effect on target organisms, advantages, and limitations. Recognizing the potentials and limitations of the different PDPs is important in formulating an effective product (combination of two or more PDPs) for the control of D. gallinae.

Amino acids nutrition and chicken gut health

Y. BAO

There is considerable interest in the development of reduced protein diets with supplemental amino acids (AA) for broiler chickens due to economic, environmental, health and bird welfare advantages. Lowering levels of protein, or using local sources, which may be more poorly digested or have an unbalanced AA profile, has implications for both animal performance and health. However, reduced protein diets may result in amino acid redistribution away from growth and production processes, toward intestinal cells involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Certain gut diseases are related to higher protein diets, and low protein formulations can reduce the risk of such problems. However, in low protein diets, a reduced or unbalanced supply of AA in the diet can be deleterious to the immune system. Therefore, an ideal dietary AA profile is crucial for broiler chicken gut health, especially in AGP free situations. All AA are in ratio to dietary Lys, and when Lys concentration is increased, both essential and non-essential AA concentrations need to be increased accordingly. Currently when dietary standardised ileal digestibility (SID) for Lys is 1.3%, the SID of total sulphur-containing AA (TSSA) may need to increase to 0.975%, Arg to 1.43%, Thr to 0.884%, Val to 1.04%, Ile to 0.884% and Phe to 0.845%. In wheat-soy based diets, reduced protein diets may lead to deficiencies in His and Ala, potentially affecting chicken gut health. Possibly the SID of His needs to increase to 0.53%. Some non-essential AA profiles need to increase, such as SID of Gly to 0.884%, Glu to 3.54% and Ala to 0.845%. Compared with DL-Methionine and DL-HMTBA, L-Met is the natural form of Met and its relative biological value (RBV) has remained controversial due to unsuitable statistical models and other limiting AA influence. Increasing AA levels in reduced protein diets has been shown to maintain growth and ensure less incidence of gut disorders.

Poultry industry in the Gulf Cooperation Council with emphasis on Kuwait

A. AL-NASSER, H. AL-KHALAIFAH, F. KHALIL and H. AL-MANSOUR

In Kuwait, per capita consumption of poultry meat was 64.4 kg/cap/yr from 2004-2016. This indicates the high demand for poultry meat in Kuwait, which cannot be met by local production alone. The Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) has conducted poultry research projects into high quality and added-value poultry products, which could be utilised to enhance competitiveness in Kuwait production systems. Their scientific achievements include developing broiler and layer feed rations, improving FCR of broilers from 2.0 to 1.4, production of high-quality broilers, strict biosecurity measures on farm and enhanced diversity of poultry products, such as meat and eggs from Arabi chickens, quails, and ducks. However, more work is needed in areas of poultry feed and added value product technology. In addition, technology transfer of KISR Intellectual property (IP) and knowledge to the poultry industry is necessary. The goal of this paper was to show the major achievements of KISR poultry research; identify gaps and propose solutions to improve production and enhance local industry competitiveness, in addition to conservation of the endangered avian species; Falcons and Houbara.

Nutritional approaches to reduce or prevent feather pecking in laying hens: is there any potential to intervene during rearing?

A.J.W. MENS, M.M. VAN KRIMPEN and R.P. KWAKKEL

Feather pecking (FP) by laying hens is a significant welfare issue in the poultry industry. Pecking at and pulling out feathers of conspecifics can seriously reduce the well-being of birds and cause economic losses for the farmer. Records of the prevalence of FP in laying hen flocks from the last 20 years show a prevalence of between 24-94%. Several research groups world-wide have hypothesised about the causes of feather pecking. From a nutritional point of view, re-directed behaviour and feather eating seem to be the most plausible causes. The gut microbiome seems to be involved in FP due to its influence on hormonal pathways and as it is influenced by the diet, which might include feathers ingested by the hens. Bird experiences during the rearing period are related to FP in later life by possible effects on the physiological development of the pullets. Most likely, pullets experience a sensitive period within the first few weeks post-hatch during which FP can develop due to various factors such as hormonal influences, nutrition and (the lack of) environmental enrichment. Nutrition could influence FP in two ways. Deficiencies or imbalances in certain nutrients, such as amino acids may have a direct effect on physiological mechanisms that trigger FP. Furthermore, ingredients such as roughages, fibres and non-nutritive ingredients may have an effect on exploratory and foraging or feeding behaviour. Literature (mainly in adult layers) shows that nutritional interventions increased eating time by 23-45% and/or the mean retention time of feed in the gut by 2.9-6.0 min/g fibre, and reduced or delayed FP behaviour. Using such nutritional strategies (i.e. provision of specific AA profiles and/or high fibrous ingredients) during the sensitive period during rearing could prevent ultimately the development of FP, by altering the pullets’ (gut) physiology and/or her time budget allocation. Research with a focus on critical periods during rearing should be initiated.

Non-infectious skeletal disorders in broilers

H. ÇAPAR AKYÜZ and E.E. ONBAŞILAR

The incidence of non-infectious skeletal disorders has been reported to increase over the past decade. Both genetic selection and rearing conditions cause skeletal disorders in the broilers. The rapid increase in broiler body weight, along with weakened, immature tissues, causes deformations by putting extra load on the skeletal system. Non-infectious skeletal disorders found in commercial broilers include articular gout, degenerative joint disease, dyschondroplasia, rickets, rotational-angular deformities, spondylopathies and ruptured gastrocnemius tendon. In broilers, bilateral abnormalities affect around 17% of the population, but the most common disorders are unilateral abnormalities in terms of leg disorders. Articular gout occurs, causing up to 40% mortality, and femoral degeneration incidence ranged between 81.67 and 85.00% in commercial broilers. The heritabilities were found for tibial dyschondroplasia ranged from 0.13 to 0.18 in different broiler breeds. Non-infectious skeletal disorders have led to significant welfare problems, including pain and high mortality rate in broilers and losses to the producer, influencing the production and quality. The most crucial point here is to optimise the welfare conditions of the poultry administration.

Role of turmeric supplementation on production, physical and biochemical parameters in laying hens

DEVVRAT KOSTI, D.S. DAHIYA, RAJESH DALAL, B.S. TEWATIA and KENNADY VIJAYALAKSHMY

In order to meet the high demand for eggs, poultry producers are using certain feed strategies which can increase production, but may indirectly cause metabolic and other stress in the birds. To overcome these issues, natural plant extracts and ingredients, such as turmeric, can be added to the diet. The inclusion of turmeric, which has various beneficial properties, at levels of 0.75% and 1% in the diets can improve feed intake and significantly reduce cholesterol in broilers. Cholesterol in eggs has been shown to decrease by 16, 24 and 25% (P<0.05) when layers were fed 1, 2 and 4% turmeric in feed, respectively. Birds fed a high carbohydrate ration and supplemented with turmeric powder for 30 days prior to sexual maturity had 20% more egg production as compared to a control group. Lactobacillus spp. counts were significantly higher (P<0.01) in chickens fed 1% turmeric supplemented feed compared to unsupplemented birds. Hence, this review includes the effect of feeding turmeric on feed intake, feed conversion ratio, nutrient digestibility, biochemical parameters, egg production, egg qualities, intestinal morphology, gut bacteria and the genetic expression of toll-like receptors.

Role of secondary metabolites of medicinal plants against Ascaridia galli

MUHAMMAD ARFAN ZAMAN, RAO ZAHID ABBAS, WARDA QAMAR, MUHAMMAD FIAZ QAMAR, UZMA MEHREEN, ZOHAIB SHAHID and MUHAMMAD KAMRAN

In recent years, the roundworm Ascaridia galli has been found to be the most common poultry parasite, with 64.8% prevalence in flocks globally. It causes a 60% to 84% decrease in egg and meat production. Profitability is reduced without proper control of A. galli, and wide range of chemically synthetic anthelmintics are commonly used. Emergence of drug resistance in nematodes has made scientists search for effective replacements. Among the alternatives to anthelmintics, natural products can be used which are more environment, consumer and host friendly, due to lower or no toxic effects. Certain plants exhibit anthelmintic effects through secondary metabolites (SMB’s), such as terpenes (glycosides and saponins), phenolic compounds (flavonoids and tannins) and nitrogen containing compounds (alkaloids, cyanogenic glycosides and non-protein amino acids). Generally, SMB’s exhibit control of nematodes by causing starvation, damaging the external membrane, impairing fertility and growth rate and damaging musculature. In this review paper, the studies related to the screening of plants and their SMB’s activities (both in vivo and in vitro) are discussed. Some plants have efficacy more than 75% and comprehensive information about their taxonomy and dosage has been documented. Plants that have been found with intense efficacy against A. galli include Acanthus ilicifolius (100%), Cleome viscosa (100%), Osmium sanctum (100%), Murraya koenigii (100%), Sesbania grandiflora (90%), Citrus limon (87.5%), Polygonum hydropiper (83.3%), Swietenia macrophylla (76.6%) and Momordica charantia (75%). Important secondary metabolites include terpenoids (51.72%) followed by phenolic compounds (27.58%) and nitrogen-containing compounds (20.68%). Such plant-derived alternatives are almost 50% more cost effective than synthetic drugs.

Molecular basis of determining residual feed intake in broilers

A. PRAKASH, V.K. SAXENA, RAVI KUMAR GANDHAM, SIMMI TOMAR and M.K. SINGH

Understanding the expression of genes influencing low and high residual feed intake (RFI) is required to elucidate the basic molecular mechanism influencing feed efficiency. Molecular mechanisms affecting RFI are controlled by many factors, such as neural signals, hormones, mitochondrial efficiency, metabolic pathways, and nitrogen recycling. This review covers different aspects of molecular mechanisms affecting feed intake, growth and, oxidative stress affecting feed efficiency in broilers. Low RFI chickens maintain feed efficiency by reducing feed intake independent of body weight gain, by upregulating CD36, PPARa, HMGCS2 and GCG, and downregulating PCSK2, CALB1, SAT1 and SGK1. Hormones, like cholecystokinin and glucagon, act as an anorexigenic factor, whereas leptin induces feed intake. Various molecular pathways and metabolic signals, such as the central melanocortin system, AMPK pathway, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and PI3K/Akt pathway control feed intake by determining the energy status of the body. A major cause of low feed efficiency in broilers is due to the reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidation of protein. Genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system such as DERL1, UFD1L, and UFM1 are down-regulated in highly feed efficient broilers. In addition, the expression patterns of the genes involved in mitochondrial energy production, such as avANT, COX III, avUCP, iNOS, PPAR2 and avPGC-1a, have been changed, and these can be a marker for selection against lower RFI in chickens.

 

New Book

2020 breeder signals

Description

‘Broiler breeders require full attention. Two sexes with completely different requirements is like managing two different species in one flock.’

Poultry meat is the most important animal protein source in the human diet. As a consequence, global production of broiler meat is rapidly growing to over 125 million tons in 2020. A relatively small number of broiler breeders has a major impact on the whole poultry meat chain. The continuing increase in the genetic potential of broilers makes the production of first class chicks increasingly challenging. State of the art management is crucial for a successful flock. Differences in results up to 10 day-old chicks per hen housed are not rare, costing tens of thousands of euros.

Breeder Signals contains practical information about broiler breeders to ensure a maximum production of first grade hatching eggs. With practical tools and modern insights to optimise sexual behaviour, fertility, egg production, and hatchability, based on the look-think-act approach. Feathering provides you signals about the quality of your flock. Too nice? Then they are hardly mating. Too little? These hens will not mate since it will be painful. The book follows the day-old-chick arriving at the rearing house towards the laying period up to egg transport to the hatchery.

https://www.breedersignals.com/en/

 Breeder Signals is essential for all people working in the poultry meat chain as breeder farm managers, farm workers, advisors, veterinarians, students, etc.

Breeder Signals is part of the Poultry Signals series©.

Preview

Branch News

Australia

The Poultry Research Foundation of the University of Sydney, in conjunction with the Australian Branch of WPSA, cordially invites you to the 32nd Australian Poultry Science Symposium (APSS) that will be held on February 9-10, 2021 at the University of Sydney, Camperdown Campus, Australia. The 32nd APSS 2021 will be available both in person and online. For details see: https://www.apss2021.com.au/

Online Paper Submissions opened on Wednesday 1st July, 2020 – submissions close Wednesday 30th September at 11.59 pm, Australian Eastern Standard Time.

The APSS is the premier avian science conference in Australia, attracting delegates from right across Australia and all around the world.

For 2021, we are excited to announce that, for the first time, our conference will be presented as a HYBRID EVENT, meaning that we will still have a physical event in Sydney, but will also stream the event LIVE ONLINE, so that delegates can attend from their workplaces or from home. In these unprecedented times, we felt that it was vital that our international attendees could still participate in our world-renowned event. So, by using one of the most cutting-edge conference platforms, we are opening up our event globally, and potentially to a larger audience than ever before.

We predict that there will be a significant decrease in physical attendees, so we have made the decision to move the physical event back to the University of Sydney Campus next year. In recent years, it has been held at the Sheraton Hotel in central Sydney. We plan, however, to take the event back to central Sydney again as soon as possible.

As always, APSS will continue to include an array of excellent invited speakers to be featured at the event. We will also provide our delegates plenty of time to network and communicate by offering a lively social programme, which will include both our physical and virtual attendees.

Major Themes
  • Gut Health Layer
  • Breeder Nutrition and Management Antimicrobial Stewardship
Hot Topic
  • Layer Hen Welfare
Preliminary Invited Speakers
  • Robert Renema – Canada
  • Bec Forder – South Australia
  • Kenneth Anderson – USA
  • David Marks – New Zealand
  • Sam Abraham – Western Australia
  • Maarten de Gussem – Belgium

For more information please contact
Email. benjamin [DOT] geist [AT] sydney [DOT] edu [DOT] au or jo-ann [DOT] geist [AT] sydney [DOT] edu [DOT] au
Phone: +61 2 9351 1656
Website: https://www.apss2021.com.au/

Julie Roberts, President, Australia Branch

Azerbaijan

The spread of COVID-19 or corona virus is a rapidly developing situation. With considerable effects felt socially and economically across the globe, there is a growing awareness that we are all facing considerable challenges. 

The Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry in the Ministry of Agriculture of the Azerbaijan Republic, including the members of the Azerbaijan Branch of WPSA, has continued to support the poultry sector during the corona virus pandemic. Experts from our Institute have organized online training sessions for farmers on several different topics, including 'Feeding technology for breeding birds', 'Features of goose breeding on farms', Technology of broiler meat production', etc.

We plan to hold an international conference that will be named 'Tendencies of Poultry Development. Innovative Technologies Applied to Poultry'. Tentatively, that conference will be held on the 5th of October 2020. If the corona virus lockdown continues, however, the conference will be converted to a video conference.

Mahir Hajiyev, President, Azerbaijan branch

Brazil

FACTA WPSA-Brazil Conference discussed the evolution of aviculture permeated by the concept of ‘One Health’

National and international speakers collaborated to deliver the rich content present throughout the event

 The FACTA WPSA-Brazil 2020 Conference finished on the Thursday night of August 13th marked a historical moment for Brazilian aviculture, after being organized entirely online. For three days, national and international lecturers spoke to attendants from 16 countries, producing a confluence of highly technical content relevant for the sector.

The event’s 37th edition counted with simultaneous translation into English and Spanish and, although remotely, participants interacted through questions sent to moderators and presented to the speakers in sequence.

This edition’s chosen theme was ‘One Health’, which, according to Ricardo Santin, executive director of the Brazilian Association of Animal Protein (ABPA) and vice-president of the International Poultry Council (IPC), is an essential discussion for Brazilian aviculture. ‘New technologies, innovation and applied science are cornerstones of a strong sector and international competitiveness. In times of fighting against human diseases such as Covid, and animal ones such as Avian Influenza and the African Swine Fever, the meaning of discussing ‘One Health’ is more evident, so that we can achieve desirable and sustainable results in all respects’, he stated.

Santin was responsible for the Conference’s opening lecture, in which he highlighted the country’s attributes. ‘Throughout five decades of strong investment and entrepreneurship of the sector, with a management model integrating producers and agro-industries, Brazil’s aviculture has laid solid foundations that have consolidated into enviable strength. Strong investments in technology and product customization were supplements to the country’s technical competence in Veterinary Medicine and Zootechny, as it continues to be the single great global producer never to record Avian Influenza. Natural advantages such as the climate and other favourable aspects are complemented by the wide offer of grains’, he detailed.

For FACTA’s president, Irenilza de Alencar Nääs, the online Conference was a historical moment for Brazilian aviculture, one that required enormous efforts from the foundation’s board to overcome the various technological and ideological barriers of its members. ‘Not everyone was confident that it would work out, but we did not allow the pandemic or the difficulties to bring us down and we believe that in this ‘new normality’ it is still possible to make a high quality conference. This is shown by our participants exceeding 400 people from 16 different countries and the expansion of our collaboration network into Latin American aviculture’.

She added that the event’s success, with high and steady viewing rates through all three days, was due to a confluence of excellent ideas from all of FACTA’s team, assertive actions and speakers with great commitment and motivation to make it into the brilliant conference everyone was presented with.

Awards and tributes

In the first day of the event, there was held the presentation of the award winning works of the 2020 Lamas Award in the Nutrition, Sanity, Production and Other Areas categories. The best works in each category were awarded with a registration for FACTA WPSA-Brazil 2021 Conference and the FACTA Collection books.

All 53 registered works are available in the FACTA annals, which can be accessed in the event’s website: www.facta.org.br/conferencia2020/premiolamas.

On the same day, veterinary doctor José Di Fábio was awarded the ‘Professional of the Year’ FACTA Award, a decoration presented to technical/scientific professionals of notorious merit. Finally, the FACTA board also made a tribute to journalist José Carlos Godoy and the entity’s former employee Nilza Marcondes, for their contributions to the foundation and Brazilian aviculture.  

France

The 16 members of the board of the French branch of WPSA elected the following members to serve as the Executive Committee for the branch:

  • President: Dr Christophe Bostvironnois
  • Secretary: Dr Michel Duclos
  • Treasurer: Mrs Catherine Hamelin
  • Vice-president in charge of the organisation of WPC2021: Dr Michèle Tixier-Boichard
  • Vice-president in charge of relationships with Poultry Industry: Mr Michel Lessire

See http://wpsa.fr/qui-sommes-nous/conseil-administration

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, and Michel Duclos, secretary WPSA FranceChristophe Bostvironnois, President, WPSA France 

Germany

The German branch is beginning to organize its next conference that will be held at the Weihenstephan-Triesdorf University of Applied Sciences (Campus Triesdorf). The meeting is scheduled for March 9-10, 2021.

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, Germany Branch

Indonesia

The Indonesian Branch of WPSA will organize and hot a World Waterfowl Conference during 2022 in Jakarta. More information on the conference will be posted as our plans are developed.

Luthi Mahfudz

Italy

The Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from 5 to 8 September, 2022. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/.

2022 ESPN logo

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA
<info [AT] wpsa [DOT] it>

Japan

The 2021 Spring Meeting of JPSA will be held at Kyushu University in Fukuoka, during 29–30 March where presentations of original research findings, a symposium, a general meeting and a council meeting will be organized. The council meeting will be held on March 29, and the presentations of research findings as well as the general meeting will be organized on March 30. However, if the Covid-19 situation continues, the meeting will probably be held in an online (Web) form. Members of JPSA will be kept informed as to how this meeting will be handled.

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS - the official journal of JPSA, IF: 0.880), recently became a member of PubMed Central (PMC), and the articles of the JPS can now be accessed through the PubMed search engine. We welcome contributions of original research articles and reviews to the JPS using the following web site: https://jpn-psa.jp/en/jps-en/. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the scientific articles published in JPS.

JPSA wants to contribute, not only to poultry science in Japan, but also internationally, by enhancing its interaction with members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges for publishing in the JPS for such members will be set at the regular membership price. JPSA enthusiastically welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a tough situation in the world, but JPSA hopes things will get better soon. Please take good care of yourself!

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

New Zealand

The 2020 New Zealand Poultry Industry Conference will be held on 6-7 October 2020, in Nelson, New Zealand

Reza Abdollahi, Secretary, New Zealand Branch

Sri Lanka

WPSA SRI LANKA BRANCH NEWS

The Sri Lanka Branch will be havng its Annual Scientific Sessions and Industrial Evening on 23rd October 2020, at Hotel Taj Samudra Colombo. At the Scientific sessions there will be research papers by local scientists both oral and poster presentations on topics related to poultry. As customary the best presentation is given an award.
The theme for the evening is ‘Economic Impact on Covid19 for the Poultry Industry’.
Due to the prevailing Covid19 situation we have to restrict participation, hence there will not be any foreign participants. However we have invited Dr Chin How Cheong our honourable life member from Singapore to give a presentation on a virtual platform
Locally we hope to get an expert Economist as our Guest Speaker on the theme.

The days’ proceedings will end with an Industry Awards Ceremony and dinner  at the same venue.

Turkey

The WPSA Turkish Branch decided to hold our board meetings online from now on with the participation of all board members.

During our initial on-line meeting, it was decided to hold discussions with the Ministry of Agriculture and other professional associations after the lifting of restrictions and to exchange ideas for solving the many difficulties currently facing the poultry sector due to the pandemic. Another decision taken was that our Biennial National Poultry Congress for Turkey will be scheduled for the second half of 2021 with the cooperation of one of our universities.

Prof. Dr. Kâzım Şahin, Secretary of the Turkish Branch

USA

The USA and Canadian branches of the WPSA hosted the annual WPSA Lecture that was presented on July 20th during the Poultry Science Association’s first ever virtual Annual Meeting. The speaker was Dr. Frank Mitloehner from the Department of Animal Science at the University of California-Davis campus, and the topic was ‘The 2050 Challenge: Feeding the World Without Wasting It.’ Dr. Mitloehner addressed the true impact of poultry and livestock production on climate change and how we as poultry scientists might help share these messages with the public. The WPSA Lecture served as the Keynote address for this year’s virtual Annual Meeting and was exceptionally well attended.

Bob Buresh, WPSA Senior Vice President, and Secretary USA Branch 

 

June 2018 Newsletter

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
Volume 43, June 2018  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein, ghavenst [AT] ncsu [DOT] edu 

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

Board meeting 2018
The annual WPSA board meeting is planned for 16-17 September 2018 in Dubrovnik, Croatia, prior to the European Poultry Conference.

WPSA programmes
WPSA has several programmes to support members and branches. Details on the Travel Grant programmes, the Speakers’ Bureau programme and proposals for Branch Development can be found on the WPSA website. Criteria for eligibility are published together with the (different) deadlines for the individual programmes. Please follow the instructions as inaccurate, incomplete and late applications have to be rejected. 

WPSA presence at conferences and exhibitions
WPSA representatives were present at AGRA ME, Dubai, UAE and Victam Asia in Bangkok, Thailand. Visitors collected promotional materials for WPSA, the WPS Journal, WPC 2020 and for several other symposia and conferences which were on display. 

During the coming month, WPSA representatives will also attend VIV Europe, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Many members have already indicated that they will be visiting our booth during the exhibition.

The Asian Pacific Poultry Conference held in Bangkok, Thailand, from 25-27 March, was a great success. Over 1200 participants came from all over the world. 

2018 news russiaFrom 9-11 May the International Poultry Conference that took place in Nigde, was organised by the Turkish branch of WPSA; and from 15-17 May the International Conference that was held in Sergiev Posad, which was organised by the Russian Branch of WPSA, were attended. Both conferences were very well attended and proved that knowledge dissemination is very important. These types of meetings are excellent tools for that purpose.

During the coming months, several conferences and other meetings are scheduled. In June, the Mediterranean Poultry Summit, Torino, Italy; and in September the European Poultry Conference, Dubrovnik, Croatia, will be held. In November the Algerian Branch is organising the Algerian and Maghreb Conference in Constantine, Algeria; and in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, there is a Poultry Summit on innovations being planned. Members are invited to attend these events and to meet many WPSA members and representatives. Details on these and other meetings can be found on the WPSA calendar.

Change of officers
During the Asia Pacific Poultry Conference in Bangkok, Thailand, representatives of the Asia Pacific Federation member branches met. Election of the next president and the election of the venue for the next Asia Pacific Poultry Conference were on the agenda. 
Dr Sakchai Sriboonsue from Thailand was elected president and is the successor of Mr Alan Gibbins, who has served as president for past 12 years. The China branch will organise the next APPC 2022.

Cooperation with the organisation on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH)
The WVEPAH, a non-profit organisation organises training courses on poultry (for 3 à 4 weeks) in several countries. More details are on www.wvepah.org. All activities will also be announced on our website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine newThe last three months have been busy ones. Thanks to the energetic work of Dr Mulder, I had a fine list of generous companies ready to support our Journal. So springtime duties included invoicing all those Journal advertisers and sponsors. I am delighted to report that well over two-thirds have already fulfilled their commitments and more payments arrive weekly.

It was my great pleasure to receive an invitation from the Mexico Branch to participate in their Universiada. This event was held prior to the start of the 2018 ANECA Conference in Ixtapa, Guerrero. The Branch had invited some 150 veterinary students to participate in the daylong event. First the students heard from the hosts and then were motivated by the life stories of a number of successful poultry veterinarians and poultry producers. My slot was devoted to telling the students about WPSA and how they could use their WPSA membership to develop professionally, both while in school and throughout their careers. A good portion of my presentation was devoted to walking them through the steps in making a good Young Scientist Travel Grant application.

Unfortunately, many of the students had limited English skills. Fortunately for me, our member and ANECA President, Dr Miguel Casillas, assisted me with translations. Helping Dr Casillas with so much of the prep work for this event were Julio Arrellano (Administrative Director of ANECA) and our faithful, Dr Maritza Tamayo.

2018 june FB Ruiz anecaCovering not only the Universiada, but the entire ANECA event was Benjamin Ruiz, Editor-in-Chief for Watt Publishing’s Industria Avicola. Before I even departed from Ixtapa, there was an article on-line detailing the Universiada. Mr. Ruiz also gave a very nice ‘plug’ for WPSA and the opportunities we offer students. I was especially happy that he reported on the two Mexican students who took advantage of such WPSA-sponsored programmes to attend the WPSA/United States Branch Student Programme at the 2018 Pacific Egg and Poultry Association in California.

Dr Francine Bradley


 

Branch Development Programme

In the Board meeting held during WPC2016 in Beijing, China, the Board decided to increase the funds available for Branch Development by making a formal call for Branch Development Proposals. In 2018 we approved proposals from Croatia and Senegal.

For more information click here.

Next deadline for submission of Branch Development Proposals is July 1st.


epc2018 website 

 
  XV EUROPEAN POULTRY CONFERENCE  

   Dubrovnik, Croatia, 17-21 September 2018 


The Croatian Branch is finalising its preparation for EPC 2018 which will be held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, on September 17-21, 2018. The submission of abstracts ended on March 15, 2018. EPC 2018 will have a very interesting scientific programme, so you are warmly invited to join us and contribute to the Congress!

The Conference will be held in Valamar Hotel & Resorts in Dubrovnik, Croatia, from 17-21 September, and we anticipate that more than 1,000 participants from all over the world will be in attendance to improve their knowledge of poultry research and production.

Early Bird Registration ended on April 30, 2018, but registration is still open to those interested in attending. Special registration fees apply for WPSA members and students.

More information can be found on the web site www.epc2018.com

Conference topics

  • Economics and Marketing
  • Nutrition
  • Breeding and Genetics
  • Egg Safety and Quality
  • Poultry Meat Quality and safety
  • Reproduction and Incubation
  • Poultry Health
  • Poultry Housing and management
  • Poultry Welfare
  • Turkeys
  • Education an Information
  • Physiology
  • Family Poultry Production
  • Antibiotic Resistance
  • Other

EPC2018 Programme at a glance

MONDAY, 17TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Welcome cocktail and Opening Ceremony

TUESDAY, 18TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Plenary sessions in the morning
Oral presentation and Workshops in the afternoon

WEDNESDAY 19TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Plenary sessions in the morning
Oral presentation and Workshops in the afternoon
Gala dinner

THURSDAY, 20TH SEPTEMBER 2018
Plenary sessions in the morning
Workshops in the afternoon
Closing ceremony

FRIDAY, 21ST SEPTEMBER 2018
Technical tour and Youth programme

Plenary Speakers and the titles of their Lectures

(Alphabetical order)

Barbut, Shai: New insights on breast myopathies
De Cesare, Alessandra: Metagenomic insights into the dynamics of microbial communities in poultry and poultry products : current challenges and future opportunities.
Humphrey, Tom: Campylobacter infection compromises broiler health, welfare and performance.
Norton, Tomas: Application of precision livestock farming technologies in the poultry sector.
Nys, Yves: How scientific innovation may improve egg production and quality on the development of non-food uses of eggs.
Ryhlil, Ivan: Microbiota, chicken gut health, and antibiotic reduction/resistance.
Savic, Vladimir: Viral infections of poultry – the globally challenging situation.
Siegert, Wolfgang: Non-essential amino acids – the forgotten nutrients.
Sossidou, Evangelia N.: Managing on-farm health and welfare risks to promote sustainability in poultry.
Steenfeldt, Sanna: Alternative protein sources for poultry nutrition.
Tixier-Boichard, Michelle: Are there limits to selection in poultry: theoretical, biological, ethical, environmental?
Yalcin, Servet: Preincubation and incubation conditions, hatching time and broiler growth.

WPSA’s Croatian Branch members are looking forward to welcoming you to Dubrovnik

Helga Medic, Secretary, Croatia Branch


European Federation

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and the end of 2018.
News from a number of European Federation's working groups is provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

Nutrition

The next European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN2019) will be organised by the Polish Branch, and will be held in Gdansk, Poland from 10-13 June 2019. We will look forward to seeing all of you there.

WG4 and 5

2019 eggmeat banner
The ‘XXIV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat’ will be conjointly held with the ‘XVIII European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products’ in Çeşme, İzmir, Turkey between 23 -26 June 2019. Visit http://www.eggmeat2019.com to keep you updated. Special reduced registration fees are available for WPSA members and students.


Asia Pacific Federation

Asia Pacific Federation Meeting

The Asia Pacific Federation held its General Meeting on 26th March during the Asian Pacific Poultry Conference in Bangkok. This was well attended by delegates from nine of the Federation branches as well as the President of WPSA, Dr Ning Yang and the General Secretary of WPSA, Dr Roel Mulder.
The current President, Senior Vice President and Junior Vice President of the Asia/Pacific Federation, their four-year terms at an end, stepped down. In the following election of officers of the Federation Dr Sakchai Sriboonsue from the Thailand branch was elected as the new President with Mr Chuang Ma from the China branch elected as Senior Vice-President and Dr Nasir Mukhtar from the Pakistan branch elected as Junior Vice-President.
The office of Secretary is not an elected one, so in due course a new Secretary will be chosen and announced by the Presidents. The outgoing Secretary is Dr M. Abdollahi from the New Zealand branch.
The Immediate Past President, Mr Alan Gibbins from the New Zealand branch, who had served in this role for 12 years congratulated the new leadership of the Federation and wished them and the Federation well for the future.
Under another agenda item, the selection of host for the upcoming 12th APPC was made. This was gained by the China branch. The meeting attendees thanked the China branch for taking on this huge responsibility.
Other discussions at the meeting focussed on the Federation’s Constitution and a draft protocol for the selection of hosts for future Federation conferences.

Alan Gibbins, President Asian/Pacific Federation

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

A meeting of the Ratite Working Group was held on 14 March 2018 in Oudtshoorn, South Africa. The next Ratite Science Symposium has been planned for 2020. Anyone who is involved in ratite research and is interested in joining the Ratite Working Group is asked to contact Anel Engelbrecht at anele [AT] elsenburg [DOT] com.

Anel Engelbrecht


World's Poultry Science Journal

You are likely aware that the last few years have seen academic publishers engaging with scholarly collaboration networks in various ways, trying to balance their popularity with authors and researchers against concerns over large-scale copyright infringement. Cambridge University Press, along with SpringerNature and Thieme, has just signed an agreement with ResearchGate to foster responsible sharing - see our joint statement here. Other publishers took part in the negotiations and are working to have a deal in place soon.

Click here for the full article.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • Muhammad Arif - Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan) as an alternative protein source in broiler feed
  • Stephen Rose - Egg production in China
  • Jag Mohan - History of artificial insemination in poultry, its components and significance
  • Vincenzo Tufarelli - Practical applications of agricultural wastes in poultry feeding in Mediterranean and Middle East regions. Part 1: citrus, grape, pomegranate and apple wastes
  • Mahmoud Alagawany - The usefulness of oregano and its derivatives in poultry nutrition
  • Usama Aftab - Prospects of improving efficiency of feed uitilisation in broiler
  • Birendra Mishra - Regulation of egg formation in the oviduct of laying hens
  • Vincenzo Tufarelli - Practical applications of agricultural wastes in poultry feeding in Mediterranean and Middle East regions. Part 2: tomato, olive, date, sunflower wastes
  • Elena Sizova - Metal particles as trace-element sources: current state and future prospects
  • M. Shahid Mahmood - Role of cytosine-phosphate-guanosine-Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) as adjuvant in poultry vaccines
  • Sun Chao - Prospects of royal jelly as a potential natural feed additive in poultry diets

Summaries

Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan) as an alternative protein source in broiler feed

M.E. ABD EL-HACK, A.A. SWELUM, M.A. ABDEL-LATIF, D. MÁS TORO and M. ARIF

Pigeon pea (PP), Cajanus cajan, is a plant that is cultivated for human food and animal feed. It exists as a wide range of cultivars, and their flexibility for use in animal rearing systems have made PP popular, especially for small-scale farmers. PP is grown widely in India and in parts of Africa and Central America. The main producers of PP in the world are India, Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Malawi, Ethiopia, Mozambique, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, the West Indies in the Caribbean and Latin America region, Indonesia and the Philippines and Australia. Analysis has shown that PP contains 17.9-24.3% crude protein (CP) in whole grain, and 21.1-28.1% in split seeds, and high protein genotypes contain 32.5%. Optimal levels of utilisation have been shown to improve broiler performance and may reduce daily feed cost. However, PP contains anti-nutritional factors that negatively affect feed efficiency. The use of processing methods such as fermentation, boiling, milling, soaking, and roasting can minimise any harmful effects and improve its nutritive quality, positively enhancing performance parameters. Studies on the use of PP suggested that it can be included at 7.5% of the diet or as 50% substitution for soybean meal in broiler diets.

Egg production in China

Z. YANG, S.P. ROSE, H.M. YANG, V. PIRGOZLIEV and Z.Y. WANG

China has been the world’s largest producer of eggs for the last 30 years. There have been considerable recent changes in the structure of the egg industry due to rapid economic growth, improved supply chains and favourable prices. Since 2012, revenue from poultry has increased by 8.7% on average. Annual growth rate of egg production has been approximately 0.6 million tonnes per year from 2000 to 2016 (FAO, 2017), and 2016 saw the total eggs produced reaching a peak of 31 million tonnes. Egg production in China continues to provide the population with a significant proportion of their intake of high quality dietary protein. Egg consumption is expected to continue to increase with the rise in the urban population. It is probable that the highest increase in demand for eggs will be for ‘out of home’ consumption and in processed food products. These levels of production are associated with the spread of intensive systems. The poultry sector is no longer dominated by hundreds of millions of smallholders keeping birds as a side-line activity and many small farmers have ceased production. Chinese consumers are becoming more focused on the quality and safety of eggs. Future developments in the egg production are expected to concentrate on quality, safety and traceability of eggs.

History of artificial insemination in poultry, its components and significance

J. MOHAN, S.K. SHARMA, G. KOLLURI and K. DHAMA

Artificial insemination (AI) technology use in poultry production has enabled the rapid dissemination of genetic material from a small number of superior males to a high number of females. Excellent fertility in poultry can be obtained by AI compared to natural mating. Successful application of this technique needs good quality semen that should be inseminated very close to the sperm storage tubules in the female to obtain the optimum fertility in chicken. Since the 1950s, AI has been used in commercial poultry production, initially in Israel and Australia, followed by the USA. Doses of spermatozoa required for AI increases with storage time or that obtained from aged bird. The average volume of semen is between 0.05-0.50 ml in light chicken breeds and 0.1-0.9 ml in heavy males. In light turkeys, volume is 0.08-0.30 ml, whereas in heavy-weight males it is 0.1-0.33 ml. Quality evaluation of semen gives an indication of the male reproductive potential and is the major determinant of fertility and subsequently hatchability of eggs. Semen from cockerels contains between 3-7 billion sperm cells/ml. Among the several factors that influence the semen quality, sperm motility is a primary determinant of fertility in domestic fowls; however, visual examination of semen cannot be ignored for successful AI under field conditions. Dilution of low and viscous volume of avian semen is essential for handling and storage, and chicken semen typically requires a two to three-fold dilution. Collected samples should be preserved at 2-8°C for avian species, ideally with turkey sperm stored at 4-8°C, and chicken semen at 7-8°C for good fertility. Currently, the technique of AI in most of the poultry species is well developed; however, there is a need for successful development programme of this technique in non-domesticated birds to assist in creating viable, self-sustaining populations of critically endangered species.

Practical applications of agricultural wastes in poultry feeding in Mediterranean and Middle East regions. Part 1: citrus, grape, pomegranate and apple wastes

M. AZIZI, A.R. SEIDAVI, M. RAGNI, V. LAUDADIO and V. TUFARELLI

In the last few decades, there has been growing interest in the use of agricultural wastes as feed ingredients in poultry diet to maximise their potential output. Many wastes of the agroindustry (e.g. citrus, grape, pomegranate and apple processing) have significant antioxidant properties, due to their bioactive compounds (polyphenols, flavonoids). It has been reported that citrus and grape wastes can be successfully included in broilers diets up to 3%, which increases carcass and meat yield and reduces abdominal fat (by 10% on average). Pomegranate can be included up to 2% supplementation and is associated with improved feed efficiency (by 12% in broilers). Apple by-products can be formulated up to 5% in diets for meat-type broilers and up to 10% in laying hens diet to reduce oxidative stress. Therefore, the application of these by-products in poultry diets could combine the positive effects of improving the qualitative characteristics of animal products as well as human health with reducing concerns related with their disposal into the environment. In this review, the findings on the effects of some agricultural wastes, from typically-cultivated products originating in Mediterranean and Middle East regions on poultry performance, carcass characteristics, immune response, plasma constitutes, intestinal microbiota and enzyme activity are reviewed and discussed.

The usefulness of oregano and its derivatives in poultry nutrition

M. ALAGAWANY, M.E. ABD EL-HACK, M.R. FARAG, H.M. SHAHEEN, M.A. ABDEL-LATIF, A.E. NORELDIN and A.K. PATRA

Origanum vulgare is a natural, less toxic, residue free feed supplement for poultry when compared to other synthetic ingredients. It contains key bioactive components, including as thymol and carvacrol. O. vulgare as a poultry feed supplement has had an antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiviral, immunomodulatory and antiparasitic effect. The potential advantages of utilising oregano extracts, in poultry diets include improved feed intake and feed conversion, enhanced digestion, expanded productive performance, down-regulated disease incidence and economic losses. From the available literature, average inclusions of oregano essential oil up to 600 mg/kg in broiler diets increased body weight gain. Using 1% oregano oil in broiler diets improved feed conversion ratio and feed utilisation. Moreover, oregano can induce a marked improvement on the intestinal microbiota and ileal villus height of broilers when combine with attapulgite by ratio 15 mg/kg of oregano. Broilers fed 300-ppm oregano oil in their diet display higher IgG titres relative to those reared on control (without supplementation) diet. Including 240 mg oregano supplementation per kg diet appears to give an optimum level for protecting broiler chickens from C. perfringens infections. Bioactive components extracted from O. vulgare parts could be used in poultry diets levels of 10 to 30 g/kg. This review includes information on the use of O. vulgare and its derivatives in poultry nutrition. To maximise the overall productivity of poultry, oregano may be used as a natural alternative to antibiotics and drugs due to the absence of side effects and residues.

Prospects of improving efficiency of feed utilisation in broiler

U. AFTAB, M.R. BEDFORD and D. CRESWELL

This review provides a synopsis of nutritional strategies used to improve the efficiency of feed efficiency (FE) of broilers at a given nutrient density. A small reduction in feed intake can improve FE as a function of improved nutrient digestibility and or post-absorptive metabolism. Restriction of nutrient intake to slow down growth during the mid-growth period followed by reinstatement of conventional feed afterwards, may lead to compensatory growth and improved FE. Replacement of part of the dietary starch with a slowly digested starch source has been shown to help improve growth performance and FE, perhaps by sparing amino acid catabolism by enterocytes, and/or through more synchronised uptake of glucose and nitrogen by the systemic circulation. Development of a larger, more functional gizzard, through provision of feed with coarser particles or structural fibre has been shown to improve digestibility and efficiency of nutrient utilisation. Although broilers are often fed pelleted diets which achieve better growth performance than a mash counterpart, the particulars of the process, including pellet quality, pelleting temperature, and particle size within pellets are important determinants of the magnitude of the pelleting response. Use of the high doses of phytase, often referred to as phytase super-dosing, targeting more complete phytate destruction have been shown to improve FE of broiler fed commercial diets. It can be speculated that combined use of these strategies could potentially help improve FE by between 8 to 10 points (0.08-0.1).

Regulation of egg formation in the oviduct of laying hen

N. SAH and B. MISHRA

In the adult hen, the oviduct receives the ovum from the ovary and provides the biological environment for the formation and potential fertilisation of the egg. During egg formation, albumin, from the magnum is deposited around the yolk, followed by the eggshell membranes from the isthmus, which subsequently surround the egg. As the yolk traverses through the oviduct, calcium is deposited on to it, from the uterus, forming a hardened eggshell. Ovalbumin, avid in and ovomucin secreted from magnum provides content and antimicrobial activity in the egg-white. Collagen X and fibril in 1 from the isthmus make up the fibrous eggshell membranes. Cabinda 1, ovocleidin-116 and secreted phosphoprotein 1 secreted from the shell gland contribute in calcium ion remodelling for eggshell mineralisation. This review summarises the expression pattern and functional role of genes having a leading role in the egg formation.

Practical applications of agricultural wastes in poultry feeding in Mediterranean and Middle East regions. Part 2: tomato, olive, date, sunflower wastes

M. AZIZI, A.R. SEIDAVI, M. RAGNI, V. LAUDADIO and V. TUFARELLI

Agroindustry wastes from tomato, olive, date and sunflower processing have valuable nutritional characteristics, and could be included in poultry rations to facilitate reducing feeding costs. By-products of tomato and olive processing can be supplemented in the diet of broilers and laying hens by up to 10% without detrimental effects on production, whilst improving the biochemical blood profile and enhancing the oxidative status of birds. Published research has shown that feeding sunflower and date wastes could be successfully added to diet at high inclusion levels (up to 30 and 40%, respectively) resulting in heavier broiler carcasses and increased number of eggs produced by laying hens. In this paper, applications of agricultural wastes and by-products in poultry feeding is reviewed, and the documented and novel findings related to their influence on poultry production, health and gut microbiota are discussed.

Metal particles as trace-element sources: current state and future prospects

V.I. FISININ, S.А. MIROSHNIKOV, Е.А. SIZOVA, А.S. USHAKOV and Е.P. MIROSHNIKOVA

Birds have evolved in direct contact with natural nanoparticles (NPs) that are identical to artificial trace-element NPs. This relationship, the high action potential and their ability to reduce environmental pollution make NPs a promising component of bird diets. However, from available published studies there is no unity in justifying the applied dosages of NPs and their calculations. NPs are used in the studies in various doses, for example: Cu 0.5-50 mg/kg, Ag 10-1000 mg/kg, Se 0.2-5 mg/kg, Cr 500-1500 ppb. Therefore, universal approaches and criteria of NP investigations are necessary for the establishment of their use in feed.
The mechanisms of action of the trace elements in artificial NPs in birds vary from the those of ionic forms of trace elements, which determine the differences in the productive effect. According to data from different authors, chickens receiving NPs in feed have higher chickens body weight by 13-24%. Such benefits have increased interest in sources of trace-element NPs significantly over the past two decades. The design of trace-element NPs has led to promising developments in the safe use of NPs for poultry nutrition, such as coating NPs with inert substances and adjusting their size. However, constraining circumstances determined by the difficulty of predicting the toxic properties of nanostructures exist, even though artificial trace-element NPs are a relatively safe class of nanostructures due to their production requirements, and metal NPs are already used in human food and medicine. The following review discusses the benefits and potential hazardous effects of NPs and the possibility of using them as feed supplements for poultry.

Role of cytosine-phosphate-guanosine-Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) as adjuvant in poultry vaccines

M. USMAN ISHAQ, AZHAR RAFIQUE, H.M.N. CHEEMA, M. UMER ASHRAF, S.U. RAHMAN, R. ZAHID ABBAS and M. SHAHID MAHMOOD

Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing cytosine-phosphate-guanosine sequence (CpG) is considered as an immune stimulator when it is fed to animals. These synthetic molecules mount different immune responses in the animals including mice, chickens, ducks, dogs and horses. CpG ODNs induce specific antigenic immunity against co-administered vaccines and are well tolerated in healthy individuals and are capable of stimulating toll-like receptors (TLRs) such as TLR-9 to activate innate immunity. The CpG ODNs can be used as an adjuvant in different vaccines synthesised specifically for poultry diseases caused by viruses and bacteria. In chickens, CpG ODNs stimulate TLRs involved in humoral immunity. CpG ODNs have been used as mucosal vaccine adjuvants against several pathogens, including avian influenza and Newcastle disease. The CpG ODNs function to protect the chickens from Newcastle disease by producing plasma dendric cells (pDCs) which ultimately produce interferons (INFs). The inoculation of CpG ODNs along with the cationic microparticles and DNA vaccine for infectious bursal disease virus result into the influx of T cells and a reduction of antigen load. When CpG ODNs are used against avian leucosis, they result in significantly higher antibody titres. In many other vaccines e.g., infectious laryngotracheitis, infectious bronchitis, herpes, viral enteritis, Marek’s disease virus, E. coli and Salmonella spp. including CpG ODNs exhibit immunostimulatory effects. In conclusion, CpG ODNs may be used as effective adjuvants in viral, bacterial and parasitic vaccines in poultry.

Prospects of royal jelly as a potential natural feed additive in poultry diets

M. SAEED, S.A. KALHORO, M. NAVEED, F.U. HASSAN, M. UMAR, M. RASHID, S.A. MEMON, F. SOOMRO, M.A. ARAIN and S. CHAO

Royal Jelly (RJ) is product from bees that is used to feed larvae in the hive as well as a main nutritional source for the queen honey bee. It has various important biological activities including as an antioxidant, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, cholesterol-lowering, and growth promoter activities and has the ability for inhibition of certain enzymatic degradation. It can be used for the improvement of growth performance, gut health and quality and safety of animal products in poultry due to its antioxidant and immune modulating properties. The antioxidant activity of RJ is mainly due to the presence of polyphenolic compounds. It is an excellent source of B and C vitamins and folic acid. The mineral profile of RJ is useful as it contains major macro and micro minerals. Studies conducted on supplementation with RJ in poultry diets have shown a significant increase in body weight, egg production, and immune levels and is especially useful in organic production. Supplementation of RJ at the level of 10 and 15 mg/kg in layer diets positively influenced egg weight (by 5.0% and 4.8% respectively), egg production (10.5% and 11.0% respectively), weight gain of hens (7.0% and 6.5% respectively) and yolk pigmentation (9.5% and 9.7% respectively). Total leukocyte and erythrocyte counts in the diet containing 200 mg/kg RJ were significantly higher than the diet contained 100 mg/kg or the unsupplemented control group. However, the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio and heterophil percent were reduced in RJ-fed groups. Supplementation poultry diets with RJ offers an opportunity to maximise profit from safe and quality poultry production.

2018 news meyn need for speed 728x90


Branch News

Algeria

On the behalf of the organising and scientific committees, of the combined 5th National Symposium and the 2nd Maghrebin Journee’s of Poultry Science, the Algerian Poultry Science Association (APSA) invites its colleagues to participate in this event.

The meeting will be held from 2 to 4 November 2018 in Constantine at the El-Khayem Hotel. The topics of discussion will include:

Poultry welfare
Poultry feeding and nutrition
Prophylaxis and pathology
Hygiene and quality of the poultry products
Reproduction and selection

For more details on this event, please visit our web site: http://symposium2018.simplesite.com/. We look forward to welcoming you to the city of bridges ‘Constantine’ on November 2 to 4.

Dr O. Bennoune, Algerian Branch Secretary

Austria

The Austrian Branch of WPSA is organising its first WPSA-AT Meeting for the 24th of November 2018 in Vienna. This will be a one-day meeting, which will take place at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences and will cover ‘The Use of Antibiotics in Laying Hen Operations'.

Simone Schaumberger, Austria Branch Secretary

China

On 20-21 August 2018, members of the China Branch of WPSA will attend the 10th executive committee meeting of the Chinese Association of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, CAAV – Poultry Branch in Xinyang, Henan Province, China. The secretary of WPSA-CN will provide our planned agenda for WPSA-CNs session, and the potential invited speakers for the 19th Annual Conference of Poultry Science to be held in 2019. Meanwhile, preparation is underway for a Symposium on Chicken Quality, and plans for the 2018 annual meeting of CAAV are also being discussed.

Dr Jiangxia ZHENG, China Branch Secretary 

France

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

The French Branch of WPSA is delighted to invite you to participate in the upcoming World Poultry Congress that will be held from the 16-20 August 2020 in the attractive city of Paris. Information can be found on the web site http://www.wpcparis2020.com/

Please notice that the organisers propose an Early Sponsoring period for the 2020 World Poultry Congress. The Congress will be held in Paris and will attract more than 3000 attendees from all over the world: experts, scientists, researchers, production specialists will participate in presenting and discussing their most recent findings. The early sponsoring will allow our partners to have the benefit of longer visibility (three years before the event), larger opportunities in the sponsoring of activities, as well as eligibility for a 15% discount in 2018. If you are interested and want to know more about this opportunity, please contact us at wpsafrance [AT] wpsa [DOT] fr or N [DOT] Taleb [AT] clq-group [DOT] com

For more information: http://www.wpcparis2020.com/ 

Yves Nys, President–WPSA France

Hungary

A series of events were organised by the Hungarian Branch, and by the Poultry Product Board (BTT), for the World Poultry Day in Hungary. Through these events, our poultry organisations wanted to show that the poultry sector is becoming a major factor in providing our Hungarian people with high quality animal proteins, as well as people in other parts of the World.

Several years ago, the Hungarian Poultry Product Board urged a number of international organisations to designate the 10th of May as World Poultry Day. That idea was supported by the Association of Poultry Processors and Poultry Trade in the EU (AVEC), by the International Poultry Council (IPC), and also by the scientific world organisation of the poultry sector, the World’s Poultry Science Association (WPSA). As a result of this, the events of the World Poultry Day were organised by the WPSA and BTT, and for the first time this year, the IPC also helped organise the event in Hungary which has taken place every year since 2014.

The venue for this year’s World Poultry Day was the Vajdahunyad Castle in Budapest. Presenters described the current poultry situation, as well as future possibilities for the poultry industry worldwide. Over 200 participants attended the meeting, representing all sectors of the poultry industry.

Prof. Peter Horn, a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and President of the Hungarian Branch of WPSA served as the Chairman for the Conference.

Dr Attila Csorbai, President of the Hungarian Poultry Product Board opened the event, and handed out the ‘World Poultry Day Awards 2018’ for The Hungarian Poultry Industry to: József Magyar, Zsigmond Bokros, Dr János Benyeda, and Dr János Paljak.

On behalf of the Secretary of the State Ministry of Agriculture, György Czerván, Tamás Tarpataki greeted the meeting and also Tibor Zászlós vice-president of the National Chamber of Agriculture.

Presentations 

Future challenges in the poultry industry: by James H. Sumner, President of the International Poultry Council, USA Poultry & Egg Export Council (30’). He indicated that one of the main challenges for the World will be to supply an adequate amount of food for its people. In general, this responsibility will primarily fall on agriculturists, including the poultry sector. He also discussed some of the main barriers, that will cause difficulties in doing this.

Global trends in the poultry industry: by Nan-Dirk Mulder, RaboResearch Food & Agribusiness, Atlanta, Restarting of the Poultry Industry (30’). Everyone knows, Rabobank researches and forecasts are one of the best worldwide. The senior analyst showed the main drivers of the poultry economy in different regions, and also commented on their research forecasts.

Challenges and new possibilities in broiler chicken nutrition: by Prof. Károly Dublecz, Pannon University, Georgikon Faculty, Keszthely. The speaker summarised recent research regarding new developments in broiler feeding. Attention was drawn to the anatomical and physiological changes attributable to genetic improvement and their consequences to be considered in designing feeding technologies.

Role of farm hygiene and biosecurity in the safety of production: by Dr Arnaud Collard, Regional Manager Eastern Europe, CID Lines NV. During the year 2017, AI caused tremendous damage to the Hungarian Poultry sector. He pointed out that it is very important for the sector to improve its biosecurity and hygiene at the farm level. He also highlighted the importance of increasing the knowledge at farm-level about AI. He also discussed a model as to potentially how an integrated system could be applied combining farm, national and international levels.

Dr Attila Csorbai

Israel

On May 17, 2018, the Israeli branch conducted a day symposium on several topics:

  • Targeted Illumination in Broiler Breeders.
  • The Effect of Feeding Broiler Breeders with GAA-Guanidinoacetic Acid Supplement (Creatine Precursor) on Laying Performance and Progeny's Productivity.
  • Avian Influenza H9N2 - An Update on 2017-2018 outbreaks in Israel.
  • Newcastle outbreaks – Regional Quarantine Policy.
  • Avian Reovirus - Vaccination to reduce Infection

We are presently preparing for our 53rd Annual Conference which will take place at the end of November 2018 in Tel Aviv. During that 2-day conference, we plan to hold about 15 sessions covering a variety of scientific topics and issues concerning the poultry industry. During the conference, Israeli companies from various sectors of the poultry industry will present their unique products and technological innovations.
We expect to host about 550 participants.

Yitzhak Malka, Israel Branch Secretary

Italy

The Italian Branch of WPSA organised the 54th edition of its annual meeting that dealt with ‘Farming strategies to reduce the antibiotic use in poultry production' on last April 6th at University of Perugia. This hot topic was explored thanks to the contributions of prestigious international speakers such as Giuseppe Diegoli (Prevention and Public Health Service of Emilia-Romagna Region), Jim Donald (Auburn University), Marian Dawkins (University of Oxford), Roy Brister (Tyson Food) and Gianpiero Giorgi (Coop Italia). Slides for the presentations can be accessed at here our website.

2018 news italy 1  2018 news italy 2 

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Everything is also ready for the 6th Edition of the Mediterranean Poultry Summit which will be held in Turin (18-20 June, 2018) and prominent invited speakers from various European and Middle East countries will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production, especially on those issues that that directly impact the Mediterranean Area. Visit http://www.mpn-wpsa.org/main/ to check the final scientific and social programme.

Any additional information needed can be found on the Branch website: www.wpsa.it.

Massimiliano Petracci, Branch Secretary

Japan

The Spring Meeting of JPSA, 2018 was held at the University of Tokyo, in Tokyo during 29–30 March. The scientific meeting consisted of 51 original research presentations and a seminar. A general meeting and a council meeting were also held. The council meeting was held on March 29, and the research presentations as well as the general meeting were organised on March 30.

During the Spring Meeting, ‘Excellent Presentation Awards’ were given under the categories of ‘students’ or ‘members aged 30 or below’ for the following presentations: 1) ‘Inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption by leptin and its intercellular signalling pathway in broilers’ by Mikako Shibata (Kitasato University); 2) ‘Effect of monochromatic LED lighting on photoreception and post-hatch development in broiler chicks’ by Aimi Tsuchida (Nippon Veterinary Life Science University); 3) ‘Complex of myogenic-type oligodeoxynucleotide and berberine induces differentiation of chick skeletal muscle myoblasts’ by Yuma Nihashi, (Shinshu University); and, 4) ‘Effects of corn particle size in diets on growth performance and digestive tract development in broiler chickens’ by Kanako Matsuhashi (Tohoku University). JPSA congratulates all of the presenters who received these Excellent Presentation Awards during our 2019 Spring Meeting.

A luncheon seminar entitled: ‘Hikari brand iodine-enriched eggs, story behind the development and plan for the future’ was presented by Mr. Jiro Yokoyama of Nosan Corporation. Many scientists attended the luncheon seminar, and an active discussion was held after the presentation. Hikari brand iodine-enriched eggs are laid by hens raised on iodine-blended feed containing powdered seaweed. Hikari eggs were confirmed to have various beneficial health effects which were not found in iodine alone. The Hikari brand of iodine-enriched eggs is now one of the most famous brands of value added eggs. The seminar provided an interesting background story for the eggs.

In addition, the new board members of JPSA were elected by the general meeting to serve during the next two years. Dr Mitsuhiro Furuse (Kyushu University) was elected as the new president of JPSA. Dr Atsushi Tajima (University of Tsukuba) was elected as the new vice president of JPSA, and Dr Naoki Goto (Hendrix Genetics Layers) was re-elected as the vice president of JPSA. The secretaries who were elected were Dr Kan Sato (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology) and Dr Takehito Kuwayama (Tokyo University of Agriculture). The treasurers elected were Dr Takahiro Tagami (Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, NARO) and Dr Makoto Yamazaki (Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, NARO). The new Editorial managers include Dr Takeshi Ohkubo (Ibaraki University) and Dr Hiroki Furuta (Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University).

Notably, the JPSA Technical Award was presented to Dr Katsutoshi Kino, Aichi Agricultural Research Center, for his wonderful research achievements on development of practical poultry production in Aichi prefecture including Nagoya species.

The 2018 Autumn Meeting of JPSA will be held at Tohoku University in Sendai, Miyagi, during 5–6 September. The meeting will contain an open symposium, as well as council and general meetings. A symposium will be held on the revision of the Food Sanitation Law and its influences on the poultry industry. Detailed information on the fall meeting will be provided on the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/oshirase/?lang=en).

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS, the official journal of JPSA, Impact Factor: 0.771) always welcomes the submission of reviews and original papers. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to have access to its published articles.

JPSA wants to contribute to poultry science in Japan and all over the world by enhancing its international activities with members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges to publish their papers in the JPS will be set at a membership price. JPSA always welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit our JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

Naoki Goto, Secretary Japan Branch

Malaysia

The Malaysian Branch has selected its Executive Committee Members for the years 2017 to 2022, and they are as follows:

President: Professor Dr Mohd Hair Bejo
Vice President: Professor Dr Loh Teck Chwen
President Elect: Dato’ Dr Tee Ah Kiat
Immed. Past President: Professor Dr Zulkifli Idrus
Honorary Secretary: Associate Professor Dr Jalila Abu
Assistant Secretary: Dr Lokman Hakim Idris
Honorary Treasurer: Professor Dr Siri Suri Arshad
Member: Datuk Jeffrey Ng Choon Ngee
Member: Dr Noraini Samat
Member: Dr Ahmad Mujahid
Member: Dr Farrah Alias
Member: Dr Phang Yuen Fun

The 3rd Malaysian Scientific Poultry Conference 2018 was jointly organised by the Malaysian Branch of WPSA; the Malaysian Branch of WPVA; the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia; Department of Veterinary Services, Malaysia; and United Business Media (M) Sdn Bhd. It was held in conjunction with the Livestock Asia Expo & Forum 2018.
The Theme for the Conference was: Enhancing Poultry Health and Production for a Sustainable Poultry Industry, and it was held on 18-19 April 2018 at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia.
The 1st day of the Conference included a seminar and workshop on post-mortem examination and diagnosis of Adenovirus, Newcastle Disease and Coccidiosis infections in chickens at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre. The 2nd day involved a seminar only.

Total attendance: 145 participants including invited speakers
Total invited speakers: 13
Total workshop participants: 41
Total number of poster presentations: 29

Please refer to WPSA (Malaysia) website for more information about our past and future activities.

Assoc Prof Dr Jalila Abu, Malaysian Branch Secretary 

Norway

The Norwegian Branch of WPSA held its annual meeting and seminar on April 19th, 2018. The topic of the seminar was ‘Animal welfare and sustainability – can we have both, or do we have to choose?’ The meeting brought together 46 participants.

Tone Beate Hansen, Norway Branch Secretary

Pakistan

The Pakistan Branch of WPSA will organise a two day ‘National Poultry Symposium on Poultry Health & Welfare (NPSPHW)’ on 11-12 October 2018 to be held in the University Auditorium at PMAS Arid Agriculture University, 46300 Rawalpindi (Islamabad) Pakistan. The organising committee for NPSPHW would like to invite delegates to participate in this Symposium’s events that will be held in this beautiful city of Pakistan. Scientists, experts, researchers and other personnel involved in the poultry industry should attend to share their most recent findings. If you are interested and want to know more about this wonderful opportunity, please contact Asst. Prof. Dr Nasir Mukhtar, Email: nmukhtar [AT] uaar [DOT] edu [DOT] pk, Cell: +92 (0) 300720074.

The first meeting of the year for the Pakistan Branch of WPSA was held at our WPSA office in Faisalabad. The General Secretary Dr Khalid Mehmood Shouq congratulated Dr Nasir Mukhtar, the newly elected Junior Vice-President of the Asian Pacific Federation of WPSA. Furthermore, it was decided that our WPSA - Pakistan Branch will in the future regularly organise a Symposium and International Poultry Conference for the promotion and enhancement of poultry education in Pakistan.

Nasir Mukhtar, Vice-President of the Pakistan Branch

Russia

Scientific communication with industry: The VNITIP Federal Scientific Centre of the Russian Science Academy in Sergiev Posad, Moscow Region, recognises the importance of scientific communication with the industry and has a programme to encourage this effort. Every year more than 1000 experts from Russia and abroad attend lectures from leading scientists in poultry industry areas, exchange experiences and discuss innovations from local and foreign poultry science efforts in Ptitsegrad.
All are welcome to attend the courses in Serguiev Posad.

Tatiana Vasilieva, Russian Branch Secretary

Spain

The Spanish Branch will be holding its LV Symposium Cientifico De Avicultura on October 3-4, 2016 in Madrid, Spain.

Contact: Secretaría Técnica
E-mail: secretaria [AT] wpsa-aeca [DOT] es 
Website: www.wpsa-aeca.es 
Teléfono: + 34 983 474 494
Móvil: + 34 617 331 513

Juan Antonio Játiva, Secretaría AECA-WPSA

Sri Lanka

Your editor apologises for his inadvertent omission of the March input from the Sri Lanka Branch in the last Newsletter. Most of the information that was not duplicative with the information for this newsletter follows.

The Sri Lankan Branch lunched a new website for the Branch in September 2017, with assistance given by WPSA. The web address: www.wpsasl.com

Annual Technical Sessions2018 news SriLanka 1

On September 15th 2017 the Sri Lanka Branch’s Annual Scientific Sessions and Industrial Evening were held at the Hotel Taj Samudra, Colombo. The theme was ‘Influence of Consumer Perception on Sustainable Poultry Production.’
On this occasion the Chief Guest was Mr Alan Gibbins, President of Asia Pacific Federation of WPSA Branches.
He gave a presentation on ‘The Road Ahead for Poultry’ He said that in 2050 a massive increase in food production is needed to feed an expected world-wide population of 9.5 billion. With this expansion in our worldwide population there will be a growing demand for chicken and eggs which provide high quality protein and also the desired food that most people like. He said that the Poultry Industry has many challenges to face, and the WPSA Board has the vision for WPSA’s future ‘To be the leading global network for poultry science and technology.’

The Keynote Address was given by Mr R Thiagaraja/ Joint Deputy Chairperson, Cargill Bank & President of the Chamber of Commerce.
Guest Speaker Prof Nimal Pathiraja of the International School, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong China., gave a presentation on ‘Poultry Industry and Food Safety’
A presentation on ‘Optimised use of Feed Raw Materials’ was given by Prof K Samarasinghe, of the Dept of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, and University of Peradeniya. 
This was followed by the Felicitation of Dr H P Premasiri who has provided a great service to the industry as well as the branch.

World Egg Day Celebration

On 13th of October 2017 the World Egg Day celebration was held at Hambantota, a rural area in the south of Sri Lanka. A Nutrition Programme for Pregnant Mothers of the area, under the theme ‘Promotion of Chicken and Egg Consumption Among Our Society in Order to Eradicate Protein Malnutrition in Sri Lanka Through Education’. Approximately 100 participants including 70 pregnant mothers, Public Health Inspectors, mid wives and medical officers participated in the event. Six hundred eggs in boxes were distributed among the participants.

2018 news SriLanka 2

World Egg Day

October 17, 2017

 

Awareness Programme for School Teachers

As a part of its ‘Continuous Demand Building Programmes for Chicken and Eggs’ island wide. WPSA SL conducted an awareness programme for school teachers at Yashodara Devi Balika Vidyalaya Gampaha on 10th November. Over 100 school teachers participated in the programme.
Dr (Mrs) Erandika Liyanage, Nutritionist, General Hospital Gampaha, conducted a discussion on ‘Nutrition for school children;’ while Dr Athula Mahagamage, Technical Director USSEC, educated the audience on ‘Myths & misconceptions related to chicken & egg consumption’. The attendees were given a free pack of eggs with 10 eggs each.

2018 news SriLanka 3  2018 news SriLanka 4 

School

Teacher

Education 

Seminar for Key Medical Practitioners in Colombo

WPSA –SL, in collaboration with the Sri Lanka Medical Nutrition Association, conducted a seminar on ‘Protein for a Healthy Nation’ for key medical practitioners on 14th December 2017 at Hotel Taj Samudra Colombo. This again is a part of our continuous ‘Demand Building Programmes for Chicken and Eggs’ island wide. Over 80 medical practitioners participated in the programme. Dr (Mrs) Renuka Jayatissa, Head of Department of Nutrition for the Medical Research Institute conducted her discussion on ‘Importance of Protein to prevent diseases,’ while Dr Prasad Katulanda, Senior Lecturer in Medicine & Honorary Consultant Endocrinologist, educated the audience on ‘Myths on diet for Diabetes and Non Communicable diseases’. Finally Dr Chin How Cheong, Poultry Veterinary Consultant in Singapore, conducted his discussion on ‘Myths & misconceptions related to chicken & egg consumption’.

2018 news SriLanka 5  2018 news SriLanka 6 

Medical

Practitioner

Education 

 
2018 news SriLanka 7   2018 news SriLanka 8

Database Project

This WPSA-SL project is being done in Collaboration with the Department of Animal Production & Health. The projects objective is to collect and compile all data on the poultry industry so that it is available to all stakeholders and for planners so that forward planning can be done more accurately.

Seminar on Poultry Nutrition & Management for the membership

WPSA – SL in collaboration with Sri Lanka Veterinary Association & US Soya Bean Export Council conducted a seminar on Poultry Nutrition & Management on 23rd Feb 2018 at Hotel Hilltop Kandy. This was conducted as a part of our continuous effort on uplifting the knowledge of the membership.
Over 100 WPSA & SLVA members participated for the Seminar. Dr S.S.P. Silva, Director Veterinary Research Institute (VRI) Sri Lanka; Dr Mrs. Chamari Palliyaguru, Veterinary Research Officer Animal Nutrition, VRI; Dr Nimal Priyankarage, Head - Nutrition Division, VRI; Dr Prabath Samaratunge, President of WPSA SL; and, Athula Mahagamage, Regional Technical Representative USSEC, were among the panel of speakers.

2018 news SriLanka 9  2018 news SriLanka 10 

Turkey

The 'Niğde International Poultry Science Congress of the WPSA Turkish Branch' was successfully held in the unique geological wonderland of Cappadocia during 9-12 May 2018 in cooperation with Niğde Ömer Halisdemir University. Scientists from 17 countries (Algeria, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Croatia, France, Germany, Iran, Iraq, Italy, The Netherlands, Pakistan, Russia, South Africa, Tunisia, Turkey, and the United Kingdom) participated in the meeting with scientific papers. Around 300 participants took part in the Congress.

Following the first day's opening programme, where WPSA Secretary General Dr Roel Mulder made some opening remarks, 53 oral presentations and 155 poster presentations were made during the next two days.

In addition to creating an environment for the exchange of information and scientific cooperation among scientists from different countries, trips to Cappadocia and other social programmes helped strengthen the bonds among participants.

2018 news turkey IPC 1  2018 news turkey IPC 2 

Our preparations are underway for the XXIV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat and XVIII European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products to be hosted in the Aegean resort town of Çeşme (İzmir) from the 23-26 June 2019.

Assoc. Prof. Dr Cengizhan Mızrak, Secretary of the WPSA Turkish Branch

United Kingdom

The 2018 UK Branch WPSA Annual Meeting was held outside of the UK for the first time this year, hosted in the impressive venue of the Croke Park Stadium, Dublin, Ireland. The meeting began with a satellite session on Rapeseed Meal, which kicked off the meeting with a stimulating discussion on the nutritional quality of rapeseed meal and its potential for use in non-ruminant diets.

The main sessions were then led by invited speakers, Teun van de Braak (Hendrix) and Jason Gittens (ADAS), who, respectively, provided an insight on the considerations of a breeding programme for prolonging laying cycles in laying hens, and what impact UK buyers’ purchasing non-cage eggs from 2025 might have on the industry. In order to prolong the laying period of our hens, Teun highlighted how the breeding programme needs to reflect the change in the industry demands and housing systems, especially given Jason’s estimation of an increase in free range egg sales (by the major 6 retailers who have recently committed to going cage-free by 2025), requiring an additional 1.8m to 3.8m hens to meet the demands of a growing population.

The high quality of presentations was continued over the rest of the meeting, covering topics in nutrition, physiology and husbandry, followed by short oral introductions to the poster presentations, which included the participation of students. Special recognition was given to Rizwan Azhar for his presentation on how the growing site can influence the AME value of wheat for broilers; and to Hana Hayton for her poster on bio-available and total silicon in broilers as evaluated in the digesta. The President’s prize was awarded to Allison Craig for her presentation on xylanase on broiler growth and flow of carbohydrate fractions; and to Sarah Woods for her poster on selenium sources on broiler antioxidant status. All recipients were awarded with a cheque, and the prize winners were also presented with a book voucher, courtesy of Burleigh Dodds.

The Gordon Memorial Lecture was given by Dr Mike Bedford, research director of AB Vista, who gave an entertaining and thought-provoking lecture on the evolution and application of enzymes in the animal feed industry, focusing on opportunities and misunderstandings in research. Described by a member of the audience as a ‘roller coaster of emotions’, Dr Bedford’s presentation highlighted some of the findings of his experience and career, referencing caution to scientific literature and for the need to accept when enough is enough, or indeed when to accept that what you want to believe is right is in fact wrong! Finishing with presenting a 94.7% correlation with ‘per capita cheese consumption and number of people who died by becoming tangled in their bedsheets between 2000 and 2009’, it’s probably fair to say that Dr Bedford’s presentation both worried and inspired the next generation of scientists in the room, and was deserving of the award.

Finally, the industry session covered the technological innovations to improve husbandry and welfare of poultry. Dr David Williams (University of Cambridge) tried to show us the world from a ‘birds’ eye view’ (from a human perspective, asking how can we ever really know?), leaving delegates with an even longer list of questions; whilst Dr Vicky Sandilands (SRUC) demonstrated the pro’s and con’s to the different housing systems on laying bird welfare, being ever-more important as the industry is forced to change.

Ending the meeting, the reigning President Dr Vicky Sandilands awarded the President’s prizes before handing over the new presidency to Dr Emily Burton. The 2018 meeting ended an era for a number of the council members, who after a number of years of hard work and dedication to the branch, handed over to their successors for the roles of secretary, treasurer, council member, with Dr Helen Masey O’Neill stepping into the vice-president position. Looking forward, members can look forward to the 2019 meeting, which again will be alongside BSAS, this time held in the city of Edinburgh.

WPSA UK Branch Administration 2018/2019

The 2018 AGM saw a complete shake up for the Branch administration with several key members coming to the end of their tenure on Council. The end result was a milestone in the development of the Branch with a clean sweep of female offices as follows:

President                                                Dr Emily Burton
Vice President  Dr Helen (Nell) Masey O’Neill
Treasurer/Membership Secretary  Dr Farina Khattak 
Secretary                                                Ms Jackie Linden

 

33rd Poultry Science Symposium

The proposal for the 33rd Poultry Science Symposium is to discuss the topics of prebiotics, probiotics and the poultry microbiome, against the background of a post-antibiotic era. The tentative date for the 33rd PSS would be August 2020, with the preferred venue of Cambridge. As further planning progresses more details will appear on the WPSA UK website at www.wpsa-uk.com

Stephen Lister, UK Branch Secretary

USA

During the PSA Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas the USA Branch Business Meeting will be held on Tuesday, July 24, from 10:30 a.m. until Noon in Conference Room 8. All USA Branch members are encouraged to attend and participate in the business and activities of the Branch. Also on Tuesday from Noon until 1:00 p.m. will be the joint WPSA - USA/Canada Branch Luncheon in the Conference Room 12. All members of both branches are encouraged to attend this luncheon also.

The WPSA Lecture (sponsored jointly by the USA and Canadian Branches) will be held at 8:45 a.m. on Monday, July 23rd and will serve as the Keynote Lecture for the Annual Meeting. This year’s lecture entitled ‘The State and Future of the Poultry Industry to Meet Future Global Needs’ will be presented by Rick Kleyn of Spesfeed (Pty) Ltd. from Rivonia, South Africa.

Bob Buresh, USA Branch Secretary

2018 PTS Watt

 

 

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